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Categories: Cosmetics, Thyroid Disease

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Cosmetic Surgery Cosmetics Healthy Aging Skin Care
Published

Turning back the clock on photoaging skin      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A new study examines dermal injections and their impact on skin aging.

Thyroid Disease
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Novel PET tracer enhances lesion detection in medullary thyroid cancer, offers potential for targeted therapy      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A newly developed PET imaging agent has been found to be effective in identifying medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) in preclinical and clinical studies. The results of the studies indicate that the PET imaging agent may be a promising theranostic candidate for clinical use.

Alternative Medicine Cosmetic Surgery Cosmetics Skin Care
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A more eco-friendly facial sheet mask that moisturizes, even though it's packaged dry      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Starting a new year, many people pledge to enact self-care routines that improve their appearance. And facial sheet masks soaked in skin care ingredients provide an easy way to do this. However, these wet masks and their waterproof packaging often contain plastics and preservatives. Now, a study reports a dry-packaged hydrating facial mask that is made of biobased and sustainable materials.

Chronic Illness Hormone Disorders Thyroid Disease
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Anti-rheumatic drugs could prevent thyroid disease      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Anti-rheumatic drugs used for rheumatoid arthritis might prevent the development of autoimmune thyroid disease, according to a new observational study.

Cosmetics Skin Care
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Scientists 3D-print hair follicles in lab-grown skin      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Scientists have 3D-printed hair follicles in human skin tissue cultured in the lab. This marks the first time researchers have used the technology to generate hair follicles, which play an important role in skin healing and function. When it comes to engineering human skin, hair may at first seem superfluous. However, hair follicles are quite important: They produce sweat, helping regulate body temperature, and they contain stem cells that help skin heal. The finding has potential applications in regenerative medicine and drug testing, though engineering skin grafts that grow hair are still several years away.  

Thyroid Disease Today's Healthcare
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Certain per- and polyfluoroalkyl 'forever chemicals' identified as potential risk factor for thyroid cancer      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers have discovered a link between certain per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) and an increased risk for thyroid cancer.

Cosmetics Skin Care
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Why men, wealthy people and maritime residents are more likely to develop skin cancer      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A new study examines why people living in Atlantic regions are more at-risk for developing melanoma than other Canadians, providing lessons on skin cancer prevention for the whole country. To find out why, the researchers compared UV exposure and behaviours among different groups in Atlantic Canada based on income, education, and gender, among other factors.

Cosmetic Surgery Cosmetics Skin Care
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Why does skin get 'leathery' after too much sun? Bioengineers examine cellular breakdown      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A study explores how ultraviolet radiation can alter the microstructure of human skin. Particularly affected is collagen, the fibrous protein that binds together tissue, tendon, cartilage and bone throughout our bodies.

Hormone Disorders Thyroid Disease
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Exposure to dioxins can worsen thyroid function      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Exposure to dioxins can negatively impact thyroid function, according to a study presented Thursday at ENDO 2023, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting in Chicago, Ill.

Cosmetic Surgery Cosmetics Healthy Aging Skin Care
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Boosting the body's anti-viral immune response may eliminate aging cells      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Aging cells express a protein that is produced by human cytomegalovirus and is targeted by certain immune cells in the body. Harnessing the immune response to this protein could have multiple health benefits during aging.

Cosmetic Surgery Cosmetics Skin Care
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Scientists see anti-aging potential in an invasive weed      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

The fruit of the cocklebur plant, which grows worldwide and is often considered a noxious weed, has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory components that could make it useful as a skin protectant, according to new research.

Cosmetic Surgery Cosmetics Skin Care
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Simple laser treatments may help prevent nonmelanoma skin cancer      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

In a study of patients with a history of facial keratinocyte carcinoma, 20.9% of those treated with nonablative fractional lasers experienced a subsequent keratinocyte carcinoma, compared with 40.4% of patients who did not receive laser treatment.

Cosmetics
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In cells, UV-emitting nail polish dryers damage DNA and cause mutations      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

The ultraviolet nail polish drying devices used to cure gel manicures may pose more of a public health concern than previously thought. Researchers studied these ultraviolet (UV) light-emitting devices, and found that their use leads to cell death and cancer-causing mutations in human cells.

Cosmetic Surgery Cosmetics Skin Care
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Scars mended using transplanted hair follicles      (via sciencedaily.com) 

Researchers have found that hair follicle transplants can promote scar rejuvenation by altering their architecture and genetic makeup.

Cosmetic Surgery Cosmetics Living Well Skin Care
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Researchers develop painless tattoos that can be self-administered      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers have developed low-cost, painless, and bloodless tattoos that can be self-administered and have many applications, from medical alerts to tracking neutered animals to cosmetics.

Cosmetic Surgery Cosmetics Skin Care
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Researchers produce nanodiamonds capable of delivering medicinal and cosmetic remedies through the skin      (via sciencedaily.com) 

A novel approach provides an innovative solution to overcoming two major challenges in delivering medicinal and cosmetic remedies through the skin. Combining techniques in nanotechnology and optics, researchers produced tiny (nanometric) diamond particles so small that they are capable of penetrating skin to deliver these remedies. Next, they created a safe, laser-based optical method that quantifies nanodiamond penetration into the various layers of the skin and determines their location and concentration within body tissue in a non-invasive manner -- eliminating the need for a biopsy.

Cosmetic Surgery Cosmetics Skin Care
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Microneedling beats chemical peels for acne scar treatment      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Chemical peels are a common treatment for acne scars, but a new study finds that microneedling is significantly more effective for patients with dark skin.

Hormone Disorders Thyroid Disease
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Researchers examine link between pesticides and thyroid cancer risk in Central California area      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

In single pollutant models and within a 20-year period, 10 out of 29 reviewed pesticides were associated with thyroid cancer, including several of the most widely used ones in the U.S. These included paraquat dichloride, glyphosate and oxyfluorfen.

Thyroid Disease
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Pralsetinib achieves tissue-agnostic benefits for patients with RET gene fusions      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

The targeted therapy pralsetinib was well-tolerated and demonstrated high response rates in patients with RET gene fusions, regardless of tumor type.

Thyroid Disease
Published

People with low BMI aren't more active, they are just less hungry and 'run hotter'      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

To date most research on obesity has focused on studying those with a high body mass index (BMI), but a research group is now taking a different approach. The scientists looked at individuals with a very low BMI. Their findings reveal that these individuals are actually considerably less active than people with a BMI in the normal range, contrary to speculation that they have a metabolism that makes them naturally more active. Additionally, they eat less food than those with a normal BMI.