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Categories: Birth Defects, Psychology Research

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Birth Defects Psychology Research Schizophrenia
Published

Two key brain systems are central to psychosis      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

When the brain has trouble filtering incoming information and predicting what's likely to happen, psychosis can result, research shows.

Child Development Chronic Illness Psychology Research
Published

Study helps explain why childhood maltreatment continues to impact on mental and physical health into adulthood      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Childhood maltreatment can continue to have an impact long into adulthood because of how it effects an individual's risk of poor physical health and traumatic experiences many years later, a new study has found.

Psychology Research
Published

Parkinson's Disease: New theory on the disease's origins and spread      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

New hypothesis paper builds on a growing scientific consensus that Parkinson's disease route to the brain starts in either the nose or the gut and proposes that environmental toxicants are the likely source.

Psychology Research
Published

Researchers discover how we perceive bitter taste      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A new study reveals the detailed protein structure of the TAS2R14, a bitter taste receptor that allows us to perceive bitter taste. In addition to solving the structure of this taste receptor, the researchers were also able to determine where bitter-tasting substances bind to TAS2R14 and how they activate them. The findings may lead to the development of drugs that targeting taste receptors.

Birth Defects Healthy Aging
Published

Impact of aldehydes on DNA damage and aging      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers have discovered the connection between aldehydes, organic compounds produced by cells as part of metabolic processes, and rapid aging. Their findings indicate a potential treatment for diseases that lead to accelerated aging as well as a means to counteract aging in healthy people by controlling exposure to aldehyde-inducing substances including alcohol, pollution, and smoke.

Depression Mental Health Research Psychology Research
Published

Brain stimulation treatment may improve depression, anxiety in older adults      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A noninvasive brain stimulation treatment improved depression and anxiety symptoms among older adults in a new study.

Psychology Research
Published

Connecting lab-grown brain cells provides insight into how our own brains work      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers have developed a technique to connect lab-grown neural 'organoids' (three-dimensional developmental brain-like structures grown from human stem cells) using axonal bundles, similar to the connections between regions in the human brain. This technique allows brain networks to be better represented experimentally in the lab, and will improve understanding and studies of network-related brain disorders.

Birth Defects Psychology Research
Published

Are lab-grown brain tissues ethical? There is no no-brainer answer      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers offer insights into the ethical dilemmas and legal complexities surrounding brain organoids, especially those derived from human fetal tissue. Their findings advocate for thorough regulatory frameworks to ensure that scientific and medical progress in this field is conducted responsibly and ethically, with strong regulations supported by sound ethical and legal principles.

Healthy Aging Psychology Research
Published

Tiny brain bubbles carry complete codes      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Scientists discovered that the biological instructions within these vesicles differed significantly in postmortem brain samples donated from patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease.

Mental Health Research Psychology Research Today's Healthcare
Published

New study highlights the benefit of touch on mental and physical health      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Through a large-scale analysis, researchers have uncovered the ways in which consensual touch can benefit a person's physical and mental wellbeing.

Depression Mental Health Research Psychology Research
Published

Prairie voles display signs of human-like depression      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers make the case that prairie voles, small rodents that are found throughout the central United States and Canada, can be effectively used as animal models to further the study of clinical depression.

Birth Defects Chronic Illness
Published

Mitochondrial roles in antiviral immunity modify manifestations of neurological diseases      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Scientists report that a progressive neurodegenerative disease can be triggered by a viral infection. The mechanism relates to mitochondrial roles in antiviral defense mechanisms.

Depression Diet and Weight Loss Dieting and Weight Control Mental Health Research Nutrition Obesity Psychology Research Staying Healthy
Published

Feeding the lonely brain      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A new study has found that women who perceive themselves to be lonely exhibited activity in regions of the brain associated with cravings and motivation towards eating especially when shown pictures of high calorie foods such as sugary foods.

Psychology Research
Published

Developing a vaccine for the 'zombie drug' xylazine      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Chemical biologists design an early 'proof-of-concept' vaccine that could lead to the first effective treatment of xylazine overdose in people.

Mental Health Research Psychology Research
Published

Researchers map how the brain regulates emotions      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A new study is among the first of its kind to separate activity relating to emotion generation from emotion regulation in the human brain. The findings provide new insights that could help inform therapeutic treatments regarding mental health and drug addiction.

Birth Defects Child Development Children's Health Infant and Preschool Learning Infant's Health Nutrition Parenting Pregnancy and Childbirth
Published

Even moderate alcohol usage during pregnancy linked to birth abnormalities      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers have found that even low to moderate alcohol use by pregnant patients may contribute to subtle changes in their babies' prenatal development, including lower birth length and a shorter duration of gestation.

Birth Defects Children's Health Chronic Illness
Published

YKT6 gene variants cause a new genetic disorder finds a new study      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A recent collaborative study has discovered rare variants in the YKT6 gene as the cause of a new neurological disorder characterized by developmental delays along with severe progressive liver disease and a potential risk for liver cancer.

Psychology Research
Published

Exposure to common environmental carcinogens linked to decreased lifespan happiness      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers found that exposure to environmental carcinogens and psychological distress is significantly linked to decreased happy life expectancy, a measure of the lifespan during which an individual experiences subjective emotional wellbeing. These findings suggest that developing public health policies to reduce exposure to these chemicals could help people live longer, happier lives.

Psychology Research
Published

Universal brain-computer interface lets people play games with just their thoughts      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Engineers have created a brain-computer interface that doesn't require calibration for each user, paving the way for widespread clinical applicability.

Healthy Aging Psychology Research
Published

New imaging method illuminates oxygen's journey in the brain      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A new bioluminescence imaging technique has created highly detailed, and visually striking, images of the movement of oxygen in the brains of mice. The method, which can be easily replicated by other labs, will enable researchers to more precisely study forms of hypoxia in the brain, such as the denial of oxygen to the brain that occurs during a stroke or heart attack. The new research tool is already providing insight into why a sedentary lifestyle may increase risk for diseases like Alzheimer's.