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Categories: Living Well, Relationships

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Child Development Infant and Preschool Learning Parenting Relationships
Published

Everyday social interactions predict language development in infants      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers found that when the adult talked and played socially with a 5-month-old baby, the baby's brain activity particularly increased in regions responsible for attention -- and the level of this type of activity predicted enhanced language development at later ages.

Relationships
Published

Talking politics with strangers isn't as awful as you'd expect, research suggests      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Individuals underestimate the social connection they can make with a stranger who disagrees with them on contentious issues, a new research paper suggests.

Relationships
Published

Exploring the effect of the presence of familiar people in interpersonal space      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers investigate the influence of social relationships on our bodily responses to the presence of other persons in the interpersonal space.

Child Development Living Well
Published

A decade of aphantasia research: what we've learned about people who can't visualize      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

People who can't visualize an image in their mind's eye are less likely to remember the details of important past personal events or to recognize faces, according to a review of nearly ten years of research. People who cannot bring to mind visual imagery are also less likely to experience imagery of other kinds, like imagining music, according to new research by the academic who first discovered the phenomenon.

Relationships
Published

Couples with similar drinking habits may live longer      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

The couple that drinks together might live longer together, too, says a University of Michigan researcher.

Relationships
Published

Social bonding gets people on the same wavelength      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

When small hierarchical groups bond, neural activity between leaders and followers aligns, promoting quicker and more frequent communication, according to a new study.

Relationships
Published

While social media changes over decades, conversation dynamics stay the same, new study suggests      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A new study has identified recurring, 'toxic' human conversation patterns on social media, which are common to users irrespective of the platform used, the topic of discussion, and the decade in which the conversation took place.

Relationships
Published

Less social with age      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Scientists tested several hypotheses on the drivers of social aging in free-living Assamese macaques in Thailand. The researchers collected data on the social behavior of females for eight years and found that the size of their social networks decreases with increasing age. The females continued to interact with their close social partners, but gradually withdrew from social interactions altogether. The results contribute to the understanding of the evolutionary origins of social aging.

Living Well
Published

It's hearty, it's meaty, it's mold      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Scientists are exploring how tuning the genomes of mushrooms and molds can transform these food sources into gourmet, nutrient-packed meals made with minimal processing and a light environmental footprint.

Living Well
Published

What kinds of seismic signals did Swifties send at LA concert?      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Seattle may have experienced its own Swift Quake last July, but at an August 2023 concert Taylor Swift's fans in Los Angeles gave scientists a lot of shaking to ponder. After some debate, a research team concluded that it was likely the dancing and jumping motions of the audience at SoFi Stadium -- not the musical beats or reverberations of the sound system -- that generated the concert's distinct harmonic tremors.

Living Well
Published

The surprising effect of presence hallucinations on social perception      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Neuroscientists have devised a way to alter our social perception and monitor specific types of hallucinations, both in healthy individuals and patients with Parkinson's disease. The test, which is also available online, provides the medical community with a tool to monitor hallucination susceptibility.

Living Well
Published

AI-generated food images look tastier than real ones      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers have announced an intriguing discovery -- consumers generally prefer AI-generated images of food over real food images, especially when they are unaware of their true nature.

Diet and Weight Loss Dieting and Weight Control Nutrition Relationships
Published

Consuming refined carbs might be linked to perceived facial attractiveness      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

In a new study, participants' levels of consumption of refined carbohydrates were statistically linked with their facial attractiveness as rated by heterosexual volunteers of the opposite sex.

Child Development Living Well
Published

Sprinting 'like a jet' will produce Premier League strikers of tomorrow, study shows      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Sprinting 'like a jet plane taking off' will help produce Premier League star strikers of tomorrow, new research has revealed. A new study of Tottenham Hotspur's academy has shown that just a few words can instantly boost sprinting speed by 3 per cent over 20 meters. It would normally take weeks of targeted training to achieve such a large increase.

Living Well
Published

Beyond the ink: Painting with physics      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Falling from the tip of a brush suspended in mid-air, an ink droplet touches a painted surface and blossoms into a masterpiece of ever-changing beauty. It weaves a tapestry of intricate, evolving patterns. Some of them resemble branching snowflakes, thunderbolts or neurons, whispering the unique expression of the artist's vision.

Child Development Living Well
Published

AI outperforms humans in standardized tests of creative potential      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

In a recent study, 151 human participants were pitted against ChatGPT-4 in three tests designed to measure divergent thinking, which is considered to be an indicator of creative thought.

Relationships
Published

Shining a light on the effects of habituation and neural adaptation on the evolution of animal signals      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A new paper examines the possible effects of two properties of receiver playing fields documented in studies of animal psychology -- habituation and neural adaptation -- on the efficacy of mate choice signals.

Living Well
Published

Researchers overestimate their own honesty      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

The average researcher thinks they are better than their colleagues at following good research practice. They also think that their own research field is better than other research fields at following good research practice. The results point to a risk of becoming blind to one's own shortcomings.

Relationships
Published

Reported marital harmony -- or conflict -- accounts for nearly ten percent of the variation in mental health self-assessments in a broad study of Australian adults      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Australian adults who report a good relationship that meets their original expectations tend to score higher in mental health, while adults who report loving their spouse but wished they had never entered the relationship and note relationship problems tend to score significantly lower in mental health, according to a survey of almost 7000 Australian adults.

Child Development Living Well
Published

Great apes playfully tease each other      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Babies playfully tease others as young as eight months of age. Since language is not required for this behavior, similar kinds of playful teasing might be present in non-human animals. Now cognitive biologists and primatologists have documented playful teasing in four species of great apes. Like joking behavior in humans, ape teasing is provocative, persistent, and includes elements of surprise and play. Because all four great ape species used playful teasing, it is likely that the prerequisites for humor evolved in the human lineage at least 13 million years ago.