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Categories: Neuropathy, Parenting

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Depression Infant's Health Mental Health Research Parenting Psychology Research
Published

Teen stress may raise risk of postpartum depression in adults      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A research team reports that social stress during adolescence in female mice later results in prolonged elevation of the hormone cortisol after they give birth.

Child Development Parenting
Published

More synchrony between parents and children not always better      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

More synchrony between parents and children may not always be better, new research has revealed. For the first time a new study looked at behavioral and brain-to-brain synchrony in 140 families with a special focus on attachment. It looked at how they feel and think about emotional bonds whilst measuring brain activity as mums and dads solved puzzles with their kids.

Child Development Children's Health Chronic Illness Healthy Aging Parenting
Published

Disparities in sleep health and insomnia may begin at a young age      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Children and teens from racial and ethnic minority groups are disproportionately affected by persistent insomnia symptoms that begin in childhood and continue through young adulthood, according to a new study. This study is one of the first to look at how childhood insomnia symptoms evolve over the long-term and investigate how the trajectory of insomnia differs between racial and ethnic groups.

Child Development Infant and Preschool Learning Parenting Relationships
Published

Everyday social interactions predict language development in infants      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers found that when the adult talked and played socially with a 5-month-old baby, the baby's brain activity particularly increased in regions responsible for attention -- and the level of this type of activity predicted enhanced language development at later ages.

Birth Defects Child Development Children's Health Infant and Preschool Learning Infant's Health Nutrition Parenting Pregnancy and Childbirth
Published

Even moderate alcohol usage during pregnancy linked to birth abnormalities      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers have found that even low to moderate alcohol use by pregnant patients may contribute to subtle changes in their babies' prenatal development, including lower birth length and a shorter duration of gestation.

Child Development Parenting
Published

Early detection of language disorders helps children obtain right interventions      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

New screening tools in child health care are effective in identifying early language and communication difficulties in children. This is shown by two studies based on more than 6,000 children.

Child Development Children's Health Mental Health Research Parenting Today's Healthcare
Published

New initiative improves detection, evaluation of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is the most common pediatric neurobehavioral disorder with a prevalence of approximately 7%-10% in school-age children. ADHD significantly affects functioning throughout life including academic achievement, social and family relationships and occupational success, predisposing individuals to secondary psychopathology, substance use, justice system involvement and suicide. Fortunately, ADHD is treatable, most effectively with a combination of medication, behavioral therapy and school-based supports. Unfortunately, many children with ADHD go undiagnosed and untreated for years, and sometimes for life, putting those children most at risk for problematic outcomes.

Chronic Illness Fitness Neuropathy Today's Healthcare
Published

Did you know that physical activity can protect you from chronic pain?      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Reserachers found that people who were more active in their free time had a lower chance of having various types of chronic pain 7-8 years later. For example, being just a little more active, such as going from light to moderate activity, was associated with a 5% lower risk of reporting some form of chronic pain later. For severe chronic pain in several places in the body, higher activity was associated with a 16% reduced risk. The researchers found that the ability to tolerate pain played a role in this apparent protective effect. That explains why being active could lower the risk of having severe chronic pain, whether or not it was widespread throughout the body.

Child Development Parenting
Published

Developmental psychology: Concern for others emerges during second year of life      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

An empirical longitudinal study tracked the emergence of empathic concern in children.

Diabetes Neuropathy Skin Care Today's Healthcare
Published

Discovery has potential to solve the billion-dollar global cost of poorly managed wound healing      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Scientists have uncovered a key step in the wound healing process that becomes disabled in diseases like diabetes and aging, contributing to a global healthcare cost of managing poorly healing wounds exceeding $250 billion a year. Importantly, the research reveals a molecule involved in the healing of tissues that -- when injected into animal models -- leads to a drastic acceleration of wound closure, up to 2.5 times faster, and 1.6 times more muscle regeneration.

Child Development Children's Health Mental Health Research Parenting Today's Healthcare
Published

2 in 3 parents say their adolescent or teen worries about how sick days may impact grades      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Many parents recognize increasing mental health concerns among children, reflected by the 1 in 5 who say they're open to allowing a child to take a mental health day.

Child Development Infant and Preschool Learning Infant's Health Parenting
Published

Researchers propose a new way to identify when babies become conscious      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Academics are proposing a new and improved way to help researchers discover when consciousness emerges in human infancy.

Diabetes Diet and Weight Loss Dieting and Weight Control Nutrition Obesity Parenting Pregnancy and Childbirth Psychology Research
Published

Metformin during pregnancy affects the brain development in offspring mice, study finds      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

With the rise in gestational diabetes and metabolic disorders during pregnancy, metformin is also being prescribed more frequently. Although it is known that the oral antidiabetic agent can cross the placental barrier, the impacts on the brain development of the child are largely unknown. Researchers have now been able to demonstrate in a mouse model that although metformin has positive effects in pregnant animals, it does not in the offspring.

Child Development Children's Health Infant and Preschool Learning Infant's Health Parenting Psychology Research
Published

Five factors to ensure an infant thrives      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers make the case that five 'Thrive Factors' are a key element of healthy human brain, behavioral and cognitive development.

Birth Defects Child Development Children's Health Chronic Illness Infant's Health Mental Health Research Parenting Pregnancy and Childbirth
Published

Study eases concern at antipsychotics use in pregnancy      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

The use of antipsychotics during pregnancy isn't linked to childhood neurodevelopmental disorders or learning difficulties, study suggests -- giving assurance to those concerned about continuing their medications during pregnancy.

Child Development Infant and Preschool Learning Parenting
Published

First recognition of self in the mirror is spurred by touch      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Most babies begin recognizing themselves in mirrors when they are about a-year-and-a-half old. This kind of self-recognition is an important developmental milestone, and now scientists have discovered a key driver for it: experiences of touch.

Child Development Parenting
Published

Study takes wider view at household size, children's development      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Scientists are taking a more detailed look at how children's language development is influenced by the number of people in their households, evaluating the impact of the adult-to-child ratio within each residence. American demographics have shifted significantly in the last 40 years, with many more children living in homes with extended families. Greater household density -- the ratio of people to bedrooms in a home -- has been shown to have a negative effect on children's language development.

Healthy Aging Neuropathy
Published

An overgrowth of nerve cells appears to cause lingering symptoms after recurrent UTIs      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A perplexing problem for people with recurring urinary tract infections (UTIs) is persistent pain, even after antibiotics have successfully cleared the bacteria. Now researchers have identified the likely cause -- an overgrowth of nerve cells in the bladder.

Child Development Children's Health Parenting
Published

Healthy sleep needs a healthy day: boost exercise to beat your bedtime blues      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Early riser or night owl, everyone appreciates a good night's sleep. But despite the best of intentions, quality sleep can elude us, sometimes to the point where it can contribute to serious health issues. Now, a new study shows that getting a good night's sleep is tied to how you structure your day, with exercise at the heart of sleep quality.

Child Development Infant and Preschool Learning Parenting
Published

Early vocabulary size is genetically linked to ADHD, literacy, and cognition      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Are genetic factors underlying children's language development linked to later-life outcomes? In a genome-wide analysis, an international research team found genetic associations between children's early vocabulary size and later-life ADHD, literacy, and general cognition. These associations changed dynamically across the first three years of life. Both producing more words in infancy and understanding fewer words in toddlerhood were associated with a higher risk of ADHD.