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Categories: Living Well, Stress

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Child Development Living Well
Published

AI outperforms humans in standardized tests of creative potential      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

In a recent study, 151 human participants were pitted against ChatGPT-4 in three tests designed to measure divergent thinking, which is considered to be an indicator of creative thought.

Living Well
Published

Researchers overestimate their own honesty      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

The average researcher thinks they are better than their colleagues at following good research practice. They also think that their own research field is better than other research fields at following good research practice. The results point to a risk of becoming blind to one's own shortcomings.

Child Development Living Well
Published

Great apes playfully tease each other      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Babies playfully tease others as young as eight months of age. Since language is not required for this behavior, similar kinds of playful teasing might be present in non-human animals. Now cognitive biologists and primatologists have documented playful teasing in four species of great apes. Like joking behavior in humans, ape teasing is provocative, persistent, and includes elements of surprise and play. Because all four great ape species used playful teasing, it is likely that the prerequisites for humor evolved in the human lineage at least 13 million years ago.

Living Well
Published

Smart earrings can monitor a person's temperature      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers introduced the Thermal Earring, a wireless wearable that continuously monitors a user's earlobe temperature. Potential applications include tracking signs of ovulation, stress, eating and exercise. The smart earring prototype is about the size and weight of a small paperclip and has a 28-day battery life.

Chronic Illness Depression Mental Health Research Psychology Research Stress
Published

Stress influences brain and psyche via immune system      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Chronic stress affects the immune system and the brain. Researchers now show that a particular enzyme found in cells of the immune system enters the brain under stress. In mice, it causes them to withdraw and avoid social contact. This newly discovered connection between body and mind in stress-related mental illnesses could lead to new treatments for depression.

Living Well
Published

How teachers make ethical judgments when using AI in the classroom      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A teacher's gender and comfort with technology factor into whether artificial intelligence is adopted in the classroom, as shown in a new report.

Depression Stress
Published

When a stressful situation is perceived as a threat, health and wellbeing suffer      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

People experience more health and wellbeing issues when they feel overwhelmed by stressful situations rather than seeing them as a challenge, a new study finds.

Stress
Published

Researchers discover a new role for a protein that helps form memories      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers discovered a new function for a common protein in the brain -- a development that sheds new light on the mysteries of the mind and holds promising implications for the treatment of memory loss and post-traumatic stress disorder.

Living Well
Published

Knowing what dogs like to watch could help veterinarians assess their vision      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A veterinary ophthalmologist wanted to determine factors, including age and vision, that influence a dog's interest in interacting with video content. Ultimately, the goal of the study, which launched two years ago, was to support development of more sensitive ways to assess canine vision -- something that has been sorely lacking in veterinary medicine. The study found that dogs are most engaged when watching videos that feature other animals.

Child Development Children's Health Chronic Illness Depression Mental Health Research Parenting Psychology Research Stress
Published

Relationships with caring adults provide a buffer against depression, anxiety, regardless of adverse childhood experiences      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A new study sought to identify factors that would bolster resilience for marginalized and minoritized youth, using data from the Boricua Youth Study, a longitudinal study following three generations of families over 20 years in both Puerto Rico and the South Bronx, New York.

Chronic Illness Living Well
Published

Pain-based weather forecasts could influence actions      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

For individuals who experience chronic pain, weather can be a significant factor in their day-to-day plans. In a recent study, about 70 percent of respondents said they would alter their behavior based on weather-based pain forecasts.

Children's Health Chronic Illness Mental Health Research Psychology Research Stress
Published

Psychotherapy effective in treating post-traumatic stress disorder following multiple traumatic events, meta-study finds      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Psychotherapy is an effective treatment for adults with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) following exposure to multiple traumatic events. This is shown by a meta-study by an international research team.

Chronic Illness Healthy Aging Mental Health Research Psychology Research Stress
Published

Stress, via inflammation, is linked to metabolic syndrome      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A new study has found that stress, through its propensity to drive up inflammation in the body, is linked to metabolic syndrome -- leading researchers to suggest that cheap and relatively easy stress-management techniques may be one way to help improve biological health outcomes.

Living Well
Published

AI discovers that not every fingerprint is unique      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Engineers have built a new AI that shatters a long-held belief in forensics -- that fingerprints from different fingers of the same person are unique. It turns out they are similar, only we've been comparing fingerprints the wrong way!

Living Well Psychology Research
Published

Sniffing women's tears reduces aggressive behavior in men, researchers report      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

New research shows that tears from women contain chemicals that block aggression in men. The study finds that sniffing tears leads to reduced brain activity related to aggression, which results is less aggressive behavior.

Living Well
Published

Artificial intelligence can predict events in people's lives      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Artificial intelligence can analyze registry data on people's residence, education, income, health and working conditions and, with high accuracy, predict life events.

Living Well Nutrition
Published

AI study reveals individuality of tongue's surface      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Artificial Intelligence (AI) and 3D images of the human tongue have revealed that the surface of our tongues are unique to each of us, new findings suggest. The results offer an unprecedented insight into the biological make-up of our tongue's surface and how our sense of taste and touch differ from person to person.

Living Well
Published

ChatGPT often won't defend its answers -- even when it is right      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

ChatGPT may do an impressive job at correctly answering complex questions, but a new study suggests it may be absurdly easy to convince the AI chatbot that it's in the wrong.

Child Development Children's Health Chronic Illness Depression Infant and Preschool Learning Infant's Health Mental Health Research Parenting Pregnancy and Childbirth Psychology Research Stress
Published

Discrimination during pregnancy may alter circuits in infants' brains      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Racial discrimination and bias are painful realities and increasingly recognized as detrimental to the health of adults and children. These stressful experiences also appear to be transmitted from mother to child during pregnancy, altering the strength of infants' brain circuits, according to a new study.

Living Well
Published

Many couples around the world may share high blood pressure      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Spouses or partners in heterosexual relationships may have high blood pressure that mirrors one another, finds new, multinational study.