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Categories: Child Development, Schizophrenia

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Child Development Psychology Research
Published

Hearing relaxing words in your sleep slows your heart down      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers have investigated whether the body is truly disconnected from the external world during sleep. To do so, they focused on how heartbeat changes when we hear different words during sleep. They found that relaxing words slowed down cardiac activity as a reflection of deeper sleep and in comparison to neutral words that did not have such a slowing effect. This discovery sheds new light on brain-heart interactions during sleep.

Child Development Children's Health Diet and Weight Loss Dieting and Weight Control Eating Disorder Research Eating Disorders Nutrition
Published

Avid appetite in childhood linked to later eating disorder symptoms      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

The study looked at survey data from 3,670 young people in the UK and the Netherlands to investigate how appetite traits in early childhood might relate to the likelihood of developing eating disorder symptoms up to 10 years later. The researchers found that a particularly high food responsiveness, defined as the urge to eat when you see, smell or taste palatable food, at the ages of four and five was linked to a higher likelihood of reporting a range of eating disorder symptoms at ages 12 to 14.

Child Development
Published

Time watching videos may stunt toddler language development, but it depends on why they're watching      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A new study reveals that passive video use among toddlers can negatively affect language development, but their caregiver's motivations for exposing them to digital media could also lessen the impact.

Birth Defects Child Development Children's Health Depression Infant's Health Mental Health Research Parenting Pregnancy and Childbirth Psychology Research Today's Healthcare
Published

Stress during pregnancy can lead to early maturation of first-born daughters      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers have found a correlation between early signs of adrenal puberty in first-born daughters and their mothers' having experienced high levels of prenatal stress. They did not find the same result in boys or daughters who were not first-born.

Child Development Parenting
Published

To boost a preschooler's language skills, consider reminiscing      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Book sharing is a popular way parents engage young children in conversation. However, not all parents are comfortable with book sharing and not all children like having books read to them. Research provides an alternative. To boost the quality of a preschooler's language experience and skills, consider reminiscing with them. Findings show reminiscing is very good at eliciting high quality speech from parents, and in many ways, is just as good as book sharing (wordless picture books).

Child Development Infant and Preschool Learning Parenting
Published

How parents can help prevent the development of ADHD symptoms      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Parents of young children with an excitable or exuberant temperament could adapt their parenting style to help moderate their child's potential development of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), according to a new study.

Child Development Living Well
Published

Great apes playfully tease each other      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Babies playfully tease others as young as eight months of age. Since language is not required for this behavior, similar kinds of playful teasing might be present in non-human animals. Now cognitive biologists and primatologists have documented playful teasing in four species of great apes. Like joking behavior in humans, ape teasing is provocative, persistent, and includes elements of surprise and play. Because all four great ape species used playful teasing, it is likely that the prerequisites for humor evolved in the human lineage at least 13 million years ago.

Child Development Psychology Research
Published

Are you depressed? Scents might help      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Smelling a familiar scent can help depressed individuals recall specific autobiographical memories and potentially assist in their recovery.

Child Development
Published

Children's positive attitude towards mathematics fades during the early school years      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Children's interest in, and competence perceptions of, mathematics are generally quite positive as they begin school, but turn less positive during the first three years. This is shown by a recent study exploring the development of children's motivation for mathematics during the early school years, and how that development is associated with their mathematics competence. The researchers followed nearly three hundred children for three years.

Child Development
Published

Language barriers could contribute to higher aggression in people with dementia      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Immigrants living with dementia were more likely to present with agitation and aggression compared with their non-immigrant counterparts, a new study has found.

Child Development Psychology Research
Published

How emotions affect word retrieval in people with aphasia      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

People with aphasia have more trouble coming up with words they want to use when they're prompted by images and words that carry negative emotional meaning, new research suggests.

Birth Defects Child Development Infant's Health Parenting Psychology Research
Published

Patterns of brain connectivity differ between pre-term and term babies      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A new scanning study of 390 babies has shown distinct patterns between term and pre-term babies in the moment-to-moment activity and connectivity of brain networks.

Child Development Infant and Preschool Learning Parenting
Published

Early drawing and building skills linked to enhanced education and behavior in children      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Fine motor skills in young children are linked to better GCSE scores and fewer behavioral problems in childhood and adolescence, according to a new study.

Children's Health Mental Health Research Psychology Research Schizophrenia
Published

Bullied teens' brains show chemical change associated with psychosis      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers have found that adolescents being bullied by their peers are at greater risk of the early stages of psychotic episodes and in turn experience lower levels of a key neurotransmitter in a part of the brain involved in regulating emotions. The finding suggests that this neurotransmitter may be a potential target for pharmaceutical interventions aimed at reducing the risk of psychotic disorders.

Child Development Children's Health Psychology Research
Published

World's largest childhood trauma study uncovers brain rewiring      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

The world's largest brain study of childhood trauma has revealed how it affects development and rewires vital pathways. The study uncovered a disruption in neural networks involved in self-focus and problem-solving. This means under-18s who experienced abuse may struggle with emotions, empathy and understanding their bodies.

Child Development
Published

Study discovers neurons in the human brain that can predict what we are going to say before we say it      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

By using advanced brain recording techniques, a new study demonstrates how neurons in the human brain work together to allow people to think about what words they want to say and then produce them aloud through speech.

Healthy Aging Neuropathy Psychology Research Schizophrenia
Published

Firing nerve fibers in the brain are supplied with energy on demand      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

To rapidly transmit electrical signals in the brain, the long nerve fibers are insulated by specialized cells called oligodendrocytes. These cells also respond to the electrical signals of active nerve fibers and provide them with energy on demand, as researchers have discovered. If this process, regulated by potassium, is disabled in mice, the nerve fibers are severely damaged as the animals age -- resembling the defects of neurodegenerative diseases.

Child Development Depression
Published

Can we predict when a migraine attack will occur?      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Migraine is often underdiagnosed and untreated, and even when it is treated, it can be difficult to treat early enough as well as find strategies to prevent attacks. A new study looks at ways to more accurately predict when a migraine will occur -- through the use of mobile apps to track sleep, energy, emotions and stress -- to enhance the ability to prevent attacks.

Child Development Children's Health Psychology Research
Published

Cognitive behavioral therapy alters brain activity in children with anxiety      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers found widespread overactivation in brain activity in unmedicated children with anxiety disorders. Treatment with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) led to improved clinical functioning and reduced activation in many brain areas. The findings illuminate the brain mechanisms underlying the acute effects of CBT to treat one of the most common mental disorders in children.

Child Development Children's Health
Published

Blood pressure drug can reduce anxiety for people with autism, study shows      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A new study has found that propranolol, a medication that treats high blood pressure, can also help lower anxiety for kids and young adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD).