Showing 20 articles starting at article 1

Next 20 articles >

Categories: Child Development, Children's Health

Return to the site home page

Children's Health
Published

Kids who feel their parents are less reliable take fewer risks vital to learning and growth      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

The researchers studied decisions that more than 150 children ages 10 to 13 made while playing games that offered opportunities to risk a little and explore for potential gains.

Children's Health Infant's Health Mental Health Research Pregnancy and Childbirth Psychology Research
Published

Discrimination during pregnancy can affect infant's brain circuitry      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Experiences of discrimination and acculturation are known to have a detrimental effect on a person's health. For pregnant women, these painful experiences can also affect the brain circuitry of their children, a new study finds. These effects, the researchers say, are separate from those caused by general stress and depression. The study was published in the journal Neuropsychopharmacology.

Children's Health Today's Healthcare
Published

Child care centers aren't a likely source of COVID-19 spread, study says      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Parents who send their children to child care can breathe a little easier. New research shows that children in daycare were not significant spreaders of COVID-19.

Child Development Infant and Preschool Learning Parenting Relationships
Published

Genes influence whether infants prefer to look at faces or non-social objects      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Whether infants at five months of age look mostly at faces or non-social objects such as cars or mobile phones is largely determined by genes. The findings suggest that there is a biological basis for how infants create their unique visual experiences and which things they learn most about.

Child Development
Published

Extra practice blending letter sounds helps struggling readers      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

New research has shown that extra practice in blending printed letter sounds can help struggling beginner readers (age 4-5) learn to read.

Child Development Infant and Preschool Learning Parenting
Published

New study on experience of adopted people as they become parents      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A new piece of research looks at the challenges faced by adopted people when they become parents. The study investigated the lived experiences of adopted people in the UK as they become parents. Until now research in this area has been very limited and hasn't tended to included the experiences of adopted men as fathers. 

Children's Health
Published

Pediatric oncology: Scientists discover new Achilles heel of leukemia cells      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Leukemia is the most common type of cancer in children. Treatment involves intensive chemotherapy, which has severe side effects due to its non-specific mode of action. A team has now discovered a site in the DNA of cancer cells that is essential for leukemia cells to survive. Cancer cells in which the gene encoded at this site was modified experimentally died off. The gene locus thus constitutes a promising target for an alternative therapy in the future.

Child Development Psychology Research
Published

Our brains are not able to 'rewire' themselves, despite what most scientists believe, new study argues      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Contrary to the commonly-held view, the brain does not have the ability to rewire itself to compensate for the loss of sight, an amputation or stroke, for example, say scientists. The researchers argue that the notion that the brain, in response to injury or deficit, can reorganize itself and repurpose particular regions for new functions, is fundamentally flawed -- despite being commonly cited in scientific textbooks. Instead, they argue that what is occurring is merely the brain being trained to utilize already existing, but latent, abilities.

Child Development
Published

Babies as young as four months show signs of self-awareness      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Babies as young as four months old can make sense of how their bodies interact with the space around them, according to new research.

Child Development Healthy Aging Psychology Research
Published

Hearing loss is associated with subtle changes in the brain      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A team of researchers employed hearing tests and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to determine whether hearing impairment is associated with differences in specific brain regions and affects dementia risk.

Child Development
Published

The bilingual brain may be better at ignoring irrelevant information      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Results showed that bilinguals seem to be more efficient at ignoring information that's irrelevant, rather than suppressing -- or inhibiting information.    

Child Development
Published

AI can 'lie and BS' like its maker, but still not intelligent like humans      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A researcher contends that the understanding of AI is muddled by linguistics: That while indeed intelligent, AI cannot be intelligent in the way that humans are, even though 'it can lie and BS like its maker.'

Children's Health
Published

Big-data study explores social factors affecting child health      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers have used an AI-based approach to uncover underlying patterns among the conditions in which people are born, grow, live, work, and age, termed social determinants of health (SDoH), and then linked each pattern to children's health outcomes. Compared with traditional approaches, the strategy, in principle, provides a more objective and comprehensive picture of potential social factors that affect child health, which in turn, can enable better targeted interventions.

Children's Health Chronic Illness Today's Healthcare
Published

1060 million people with 'other' musculoskeletal disorders by 2050      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A category of musculoskeletal disorders of our joints, muscles, bones, ligaments, tendons and spine are on the rise and a new forecast is as many as 1060 million people -- up from 464 million -- will be living with related disabilities by 2050, placing even greater pressure on stretched healthcare systems.

Children's Health Fitness
Published

Benefits of adolescent fitness to future cardiovascular health possibly overestimated      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

There is a well-known relationship between good physical fitness at a young age and a lower risk of cardiovascular disease later in life. However, when researchers adjusted for familial factors by means of sibling analysis, they found a weaker association, although the link between high body mass index (BMI) and cardiovascular disease remained strong.

Birth Defects Child Development Children's Health Chronic Illness Depression Mental Health Research Parenting Pregnancy and Childbirth Psychology Research Stress
Published

High levels of maternal stress during pregnancy linked to children's behavior problems      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Children whose mothers are highly stressed, anxious or depressed during pregnancy may be at higher risk for mental health and behavior issues during their childhood and teen years, according to new research.

Birth Defects Children's Health Fertility Infant's Health Pregnancy and Childbirth
Published

Exposure to air pollution in utero may affect reproductive system development      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

From invisible wafts of diesel exhaust to sun-choking plumes of orange smoke, air pollution is known to damage respiratory well-being. Now, research suggests another reason to hold our breath: Polluted air also may hurt reproductive health.   In a study of air pollution data in relation to markers of reproductive development in infancy, Rutgers researchers found certain pollutants may negatively alter anogenital distance, a measure of prenatal exposure to hormones.

Child Development Relationships
Published

When languages collide, which survives?      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers incorporate language ideologies, along with the impact of interaction between individuals with opposing preferences, on the language shift process. The team chose a quantitative approach based on a society in which only one language with two varieties, the standard and the vernacular, existed. The resulting mathematical model can predict the conditions that allow for the coexistence of different languages, presenting a comprehensive view of how language varieties are distributed within societies.

Children's Health
Published

How teachers would handle student violence against educators      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

For the first time, teachers in a nationwide study have told researchers what strategies they think work best to deal with student violence against educators. Teachers rated suspending or expelling students as the least effective way of addressing violence, despite the popularity of 'zero tolerance' policies in many school districts.

Birth Control Children's Health Psychology Research
Published

Hormonal contraceptives in teens may alter risk assessment, rat study suggests      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Hormonal contraceptives taken by adolescents may influence development of the brain in a way that alters the recognition of risks, a new study in rats suggests.