Showing 20 articles starting at article 1

Next 20 articles >

Categories: Birth Control, Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Return to the site home page

Birth Control Infant's Health Pregnancy and Childbirth Today's Healthcare
Published

Higher infant mortality rates associated with restrictive abortion laws, study finds      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

New research provides evidence that U.S. states with the most restrictive abortion laws saw 16 percent more infant deaths in 2014-2018 than in states offering access to comprehensive reproductive healthcare.

Birth Control Healthy Aging
Published

Genetic mutations that promote reproduction tend to shorten human lifespan, study shows      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A study based on a review of genetic and health information from more than 276,000 people finds strong support for a decades-old evolutionary theory that sought to explain aging and senescence.  

Birth Control Children's Health Psychology Research
Published

Hormonal contraceptives in teens may alter risk assessment, rat study suggests      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Hormonal contraceptives taken by adolescents may influence development of the brain in a way that alters the recognition of risks, a new study in rats suggests.

Birth Control Gynecology Pregnancy and Childbirth Today's Healthcare
Published

Blood clotting risk quickly drops after stopping hormonal contraceptives      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Using birth control pills and other hormone-based contraceptives is known to elevate the risk of blood clots, but a new study suggests that this risk largely goes away within two to four weeks after one stops using these contraceptives. The findings can help patients and doctors weigh the benefits and risks of hormonal contraceptives and guide when to stop using them ahead of events that could further increase the risk of dangerous clots, such as major surgery, prolonged periods of immobility, or when tapering anticoagulant medications after a blood clot.

Chronic Illness Crohn's Disease Irritable Bowel Syndrome
Published

Risk of serious infection even in low-active IBD      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an independent risk factor for serious infection, even at very low levels of gastrointestinal inflammation.

Birth Control Chronic Illness Depression Mental Health Research Pregnancy and Childbirth
Published

Contraceptive pill users less likely to report depression      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A new study has shown that women who are taking the oral contraceptive pill are less likely to report depression. The research, which analysed data from 6,239 women in the United States aged 18-55 years old, found that the prevalence of major depression amongst users of the oral contraceptive pill (OCP) was significantly lower, at 4.6%, compared to former OCP users (11.4%).

Chronic Illness Irritable Bowel Syndrome
Published

Genetics links endometriosis and IBS      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers have found a significant relationship between the risks for endometriosis and common gastrointestinal disorders such as IBS, peptic ulcer disease (PUD) and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD). Sufferers can find it difficult to distinguish the source of their pain leading to confusion or misdiagnosis and years of delay in treatment during which time the endometriosis can progress to more severe disease -- endometriosis should be considered as a possible cause if a woman presents to her GP with abdominal pain and gastrointestinal symptoms.

Birth Control Pregnancy and Childbirth Sexual Health Today's Healthcare
Published

Morning-after pill more effective when taken with an anti-inflammatory painkiller, researchers find      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A research team recently published findings on adding an anti-inflammatory painkiller used for arthritis pain to an oral emergency contraceptive pill (also known as the morning-after pill) to increase the effectiveness of pregnancy prevention.

Irritable Bowel Syndrome Today's Healthcare
Published

Amitriptyline helps relieve IBS symptoms      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Amitriptyline can improve symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome in patients seen in GP surgeries, new research has found.  The cheap and widely available prescription drug, which is commonly used at low doses for a range of health concerns, has been found to improve irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms too, according to the results of the ATLANTIS trial. The results showed that patients taking amitriptyline were almost twice as likely to report an overall improvement in symptoms as those taking a placebo.   

Birth Control Hormone Disorders Menopause
Published

Birth-control pills affect the body's ability to regulate stress, study suggests      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A new study suggests that birth-control pills negatively impact women's stress response.

Birth Control Chronic Illness Depression Menopause Mental Health Research Sexual Health Today's Healthcare Women's Health - General
Published

New study links contraceptive pills and depression      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Women who used combined contraceptive pills were at greater risk of developing depression than women who did not, according to a new study. Contraceptive pills increased women's risk by 73 per cent during the first two years of use.

Birth Control Fertility Pregnancy and Childbirth Sexual Health
Published

New genetic target for male contraception identified      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Discovery of a gene in multiple mammalian species could pave the way for a highly effective, reversible and non-hormonal male contraceptive for humans and animals. Researchers identified expression of the gene, Arrdc5, in the testicular tissue of mice, pigs, cattle and humans. When they knocked out the gene in mice, it created infertility only in the males, impacting their sperm count, movement and shape.

Birth Control Women's Health - General
Published

Study finds similar association of progestogen-only and combined hormonal contraceptives with breast cancer risk      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

There is a relative increase of 20% to 30% in breast cancer risk associated with both combined and progesterone-only contraceptives, whatever the mode of delivery, though with five years of use, the 15-year absolute excess incidence is at most 265 cases per 100,000 users, according to a new study.

Birth Control Fertility Infant's Health Pregnancy and Childbirth Sexual Health Today's Healthcare
Published

High infant mortality rates and global human population rise      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

New research showing high infant mortality rates are contributing to an incessant rise of the global human population supports arguments for greater access to contraception and family planning in low- and middle-income nations.

Irritable Bowel Syndrome Nutrition
Published

Fiber discovery could shape better gut health      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Changing the structure of a dietary fiber commonly found in a range of food products has been found to promote healthy gut bacteria and reduce gas formation, a finding that could help people with intolerances to fiber and irritable bowel conditions.

Birth Control Fertility Pregnancy and Childbirth
Published

On-demand male contraceptive shows promise in preclinical study      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

An experimental contraceptive drug temporarily stops sperm in their tracks and prevents pregnancies in preclinical models. The study demonstrates that an on-demand male contraceptive is possible.

Irritable Bowel Syndrome
Published

Lower bacterial diversity is associated with irritable bowel syndrome      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

People with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have lower bacterial diversity in the intestine than do healthy people, according to a team of investigators. The investigators believe that theirs is the first analysis to find a clear association between IBS and reduced diversity in the microbiota of the gut.

Irritable Bowel Syndrome
Published

Realtime monitoring with a wearable device reveals IBS-related changes      (via sciencedaily.com) 

A research group recorded the autonomic nervous system activity in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and healthy subjects using a wearable device and a proprietary smartphone application to record daily life events such as defecation and sleep. As a result, they found that sympathetic nervous system activity was activated in IBS patients from 2 minutes before defecation and continued until 9 minutes after defecation. Further research is expected to improve the quality of life of IBS patients and elucidate the pathophysiology.

Chronic Illness Irritable Bowel Syndrome Neuropathy
Published

Treating gut pain via a Nobel prize-winning receptor      (via sciencedaily.com) 

Targeting a receptor responsible for our sense of touch and temperature, which researchers have now found to be present in our colon, could provide a new avenue for treating chronic pain associated with gastrointestinal disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome. A team examining the colon identified the presence of Piezo2, the subject of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, now known to be responsible for sensing light touch on our skin.

Irritable Bowel Syndrome
Published

How gravity may cause irritable bowel syndrome      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A new theory suggests irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), the most common gastrointestinal disorder, may be caused by gravity. An expert explains that IBS -- and many other conditions -- could result from the body's inability to manage gravity.