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Categories: Living Well, Schizophrenia

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Child Development Living Well
Published

Great apes playfully tease each other      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Babies playfully tease others as young as eight months of age. Since language is not required for this behavior, similar kinds of playful teasing might be present in non-human animals. Now cognitive biologists and primatologists have documented playful teasing in four species of great apes. Like joking behavior in humans, ape teasing is provocative, persistent, and includes elements of surprise and play. Because all four great ape species used playful teasing, it is likely that the prerequisites for humor evolved in the human lineage at least 13 million years ago.

Living Well
Published

Smart earrings can monitor a person's temperature      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers introduced the Thermal Earring, a wireless wearable that continuously monitors a user's earlobe temperature. Potential applications include tracking signs of ovulation, stress, eating and exercise. The smart earring prototype is about the size and weight of a small paperclip and has a 28-day battery life.

Living Well
Published

How teachers make ethical judgments when using AI in the classroom      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A teacher's gender and comfort with technology factor into whether artificial intelligence is adopted in the classroom, as shown in a new report.

Children's Health Mental Health Research Psychology Research Schizophrenia
Published

Bullied teens' brains show chemical change associated with psychosis      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers have found that adolescents being bullied by their peers are at greater risk of the early stages of psychotic episodes and in turn experience lower levels of a key neurotransmitter in a part of the brain involved in regulating emotions. The finding suggests that this neurotransmitter may be a potential target for pharmaceutical interventions aimed at reducing the risk of psychotic disorders.

Healthy Aging Neuropathy Psychology Research Schizophrenia
Published

Firing nerve fibers in the brain are supplied with energy on demand      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

To rapidly transmit electrical signals in the brain, the long nerve fibers are insulated by specialized cells called oligodendrocytes. These cells also respond to the electrical signals of active nerve fibers and provide them with energy on demand, as researchers have discovered. If this process, regulated by potassium, is disabled in mice, the nerve fibers are severely damaged as the animals age -- resembling the defects of neurodegenerative diseases.

Living Well
Published

Knowing what dogs like to watch could help veterinarians assess their vision      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A veterinary ophthalmologist wanted to determine factors, including age and vision, that influence a dog's interest in interacting with video content. Ultimately, the goal of the study, which launched two years ago, was to support development of more sensitive ways to assess canine vision -- something that has been sorely lacking in veterinary medicine. The study found that dogs are most engaged when watching videos that feature other animals.

Schizophrenia Today's Healthcare
Published

Vigilant monitoring is needed to manage cardiac risks in patients using antipsychotics, doctors say      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

The use of the antipsychotic drugs quetiapine and haloperidol is associated with an increased risk of ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD) caused by drug-induced QT prolongation, reports a new study. Caution is advised to manage cardiac risks in patients prescribed these medications, the authors of the study and an accompanying editorial say.

Chronic Illness Psychology Research Schizophrenia
Published

Study reveals function of little-understood synapse in the brain      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

New research for the first time reveals the function of a little-understood junction between cells in the brain that could have important treatment implications for conditions ranging from multiple sclerosis to Alzheimer's disease, to a type of brain cancer known as glioma. Neuroscientists focused on the synapse connecting neurons to a non-neuronal cell, known as oligodendrocyte precursor cells. OPCs can differentiate into oligodendrocytes, which produce a sheath around nerves known as myelin. Myelin is the protective sheath covering each nerve cell's axon -- the threadlike portion of a cell that transmits electrical signals between cells.

Chronic Illness Living Well
Published

Pain-based weather forecasts could influence actions      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

For individuals who experience chronic pain, weather can be a significant factor in their day-to-day plans. In a recent study, about 70 percent of respondents said they would alter their behavior based on weather-based pain forecasts.

Schizophrenia Today's Healthcare
Published

Clinical predictive models created by AI are accurate but study-specific, researchers find      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Scientists were able to show that statistical models created by artificial intelligence (AI) predict very accurately whether a medication responds in people with schizophrenia. However, the models are highly context-dependent and cannot be generalized.

Schizophrenia Today's Healthcare
Published

Quest for personalized medicine hits a snag      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

The quest for personalized medicine, a medical approach in which practitioners use a patient's unique genetic profile to tailor individual treatment, has emerged as a critical goal in the health care sector. But a new study shows that the mathematical models currently available to predict treatments have limited effectiveness.

Living Well
Published

AI discovers that not every fingerprint is unique      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Engineers have built a new AI that shatters a long-held belief in forensics -- that fingerprints from different fingers of the same person are unique. It turns out they are similar, only we've been comparing fingerprints the wrong way!

Living Well Psychology Research
Published

Sniffing women's tears reduces aggressive behavior in men, researchers report      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

New research shows that tears from women contain chemicals that block aggression in men. The study finds that sniffing tears leads to reduced brain activity related to aggression, which results is less aggressive behavior.

Living Well
Published

Artificial intelligence can predict events in people's lives      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Artificial intelligence can analyze registry data on people's residence, education, income, health and working conditions and, with high accuracy, predict life events.

Living Well Nutrition
Published

AI study reveals individuality of tongue's surface      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Artificial Intelligence (AI) and 3D images of the human tongue have revealed that the surface of our tongues are unique to each of us, new findings suggest. The results offer an unprecedented insight into the biological make-up of our tongue's surface and how our sense of taste and touch differ from person to person.

Child Development Mental Health Research Schizophrenia
Published

Unravelling the association between neonatal proteins and adult health      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Scientists studied two complement components that are important parts of the immune system and are linked to schizophrenia and autoimmune disorders. They studied the link between two protein concentrations -- C3 and C4 -- in over 68,000 newborn babies and the risk of developing six mental disorders later in life.

Living Well
Published

ChatGPT often won't defend its answers -- even when it is right      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

ChatGPT may do an impressive job at correctly answering complex questions, but a new study suggests it may be absurdly easy to convince the AI chatbot that it's in the wrong.

Living Well
Published

Many couples around the world may share high blood pressure      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Spouses or partners in heterosexual relationships may have high blood pressure that mirrors one another, finds new, multinational study.

Infant's Health Living Well Today's Healthcare
Published

Wearables capture body sounds to continuously monitor health      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

From heart beats to stomach gurgles, sounds hold important health information. New wireless devices sit on skin to continuously capture these sounds, then stream data to smartphones or tablets in real time. In pilot studies, devices accurately tracked sounds associated with cardiorespiratory function, gastrointestinal activity, swallowing and respiration. The devices are particularly valuable for premature babies, who can experience apneas and gastrointestinal complications, which are accompanied by sounds.

Living Well
Published

When we see what others do, our brain sees not what we see, but what we expect      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

When we engage in social interactions, like shaking hands or having a conversation, our observation of other people's actions is crucial. But what exactly happens in our brain during this process: how do the different brain regions talk to each other? Researchers provide an intriguing answer: our perception of what others do depends more on what we expect to happen than previously believed.