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Categories: Infant's Health, Schizophrenia

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Children's Health Infant's Health Pregnancy and Childbirth
Published

Birth by C-section more than doubles odds of measles vaccine failure      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Birth by C-section more than doubles odds of measles vaccine failure. Researchers say it is vital that children born by caesarean section receive two doses of the measles vaccine for robust protection against the disease.

Birth Defects Child Development Children's Health Infant's Health
Published

Metabolism of autism reveals developmental origins      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers have shed new light on the changes in metabolism that occur between birth and the presentation of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) later in childhood. The researchers discovered that a small number of biochemical pathways are responsible for the majority of these changes, which could help inform new early detection and prevention strategies for autism.

Child Development Infant's Health Parenting
Published

THC lingers in breastmilk with no clear peak point      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

When breastfeeding mothers in a recent study used cannabis, its psychoactive component THC showed up in the milk they produced. The research also found that, unlike alcohol, when THC was detected in milk there was no consistent time when its concentration peaked and started to decline. Importantly, the researchers discovered that the amount of THC they detected in milk was low -- they estimated that infants received an average of 0.07 mg of THC per day. For comparison, a common low-dose edible contains 2 mg of THC. The research team stressed that it is unknown whether this amount has any impact on the infant.

Breastfeeding Infant's Health Pregnancy and Childbirth
Published

A new mother's immune status varies with her feeding strategy      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

In one of the first studies of its kind, UC Santa Barbara researchers have found that the immune status of postpartum mothers shifts with how she feeds her baby. Certain inflammatory proteins -- substances that are secreted as part of an immune response -- peak at different times of day, correlating with whether the mothers breastfeed, pump or formula-feed their babies.

Birth Defects Child Development Children's Health Infant's Health Psychology Research
Published

Genetics, not lack of oxygen, causes cerebral palsy in quarter of cases      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

The world's largest study of cerebral palsy (CP) genetics has discovered genetic defects are most likely responsible for more than a quarter of cases in Chinese children, rather than a lack of oxygen at birth as previously thought.

Chronic Illness Diabetes Infant's Health Pregnancy and Childbirth
Published

Personalized screening early in pregnancy may improve preeclampsia detection      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Study suggests more extensive screening method in the first trimester of pregnancy may improve detection of preeclampsia.

Schizophrenia
Published

Student links worm behavior to brain disease      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

An undergraduate student turns her honor's thesis into a peer-reviewed publication on schizophrenia research.

Infant's Health
Published

AI algorithms can determine how well newborns nurse, study shows      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A modified pacifier and AI algorithms to analyze the data it produces could determine if newborns are learning the proper mechanics of nursing, a recent study shows. Specifically, the researchers measured if babies are generating enough suckling strength to breastfeed and whether they are suckling in a regular pattern based on eight independent parameters.

Infant's Health Today's Healthcare
Published

New tool helps identify babies at high-risk for RSV      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A new tool to identify infants most at risk for severe respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) illness could aid pediatricians in prioritizing children under 1 to receive a preventive medication before RSV season (October-April), according to new research.

Schizophrenia
Published

Understaffed nursing homes in disadvantaged neighborhoods more likely to overuse antipsychotics      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Nursing homes in disadvantaged communities are more likely to overmedicate residents with antipsychotics, especially homes that are understaffed, according to a new study.

Children's Health Infant's Health Pregnancy and Childbirth
Published

Dengue fever infections have negative impacts on infant health for three years      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Dengue infections in pregnant women may have a negative impact on the first years of children's lives, new research has found.

Chronic Illness Diabetes Infant's Health
Published

Follow-up 50 years on finds landmark steroid study remains safe      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A follow-up analysis 50 years later finds no adverse heart health risk from Professor Mont Liggins' landmark steroid study to reduce illness and death for pre-term babies.

Child Development Children's Health Chronic Illness Infant's Health Parenting
Published

Study finds COVID-19 pandemic led to some, but not many, developmental milestone delays in infants and young children      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Infants and children 5 years old and younger experienced only 'modest' delays in developmental milestones due to the COVID-19 pandemic disruptions and restrictions, a study finds.

Child Development Children's Health Infant's Health Parenting
Published

Bacteria behind meningitis in babies explained      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers have identified the types of E.coli responsible for neonatal meningitis -- around 50 per cent of infections are caused by two types of E. coli. The study was the largest to date, examining genomes of E. coli bacteria across four continents. The research also revealed why some infections recur despite being treated with antibiotics -- it's most likely that bacteria hide out in the intestinal microbiome. This information tells us that we need to keep monitoring these babies after their first infection, as they are at a high risk of subsequent infections.

Depression Infant's Health Mental Health Research Parenting Psychology Research
Published

Teen stress may raise risk of postpartum depression in adults      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A research team reports that social stress during adolescence in female mice later results in prolonged elevation of the hormone cortisol after they give birth.

Birth Defects Children's Health Psychology Research Schizophrenia
Published

Two key brain systems are central to psychosis      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

When the brain has trouble filtering incoming information and predicting what's likely to happen, psychosis can result, research shows.

Children's Health Infant's Health
Published

Landmark study involving babies in Ireland supports use of Cystic Fibrosis drug in infants from four weeks of age      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A Cystic Fibrosis drug targeting the basic defect that causes the condition has been shown to be safe and effective in newborns aged four weeks and above, new research suggests.

Infant's Health
Published

AI powered 'digital twin' models the infant microbiome      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers have developed a new generative artificial intelligence (AI) tool that models the infant microbiome. This 'digital twin' of the infant microbiome creates a virtual model that predicts the changing dynamics of microbial species in the gut, and how they change as the infant develops.

Children's Health Infant's Health
Published

More premature babies born following Swedish parental leave policy      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

The introduction of a policy protecting parental leave benefits in Sweden in 1980 had unintended consequences on child health. The policy appears to have led to an increase in premature birth rates.

Birth Defects Child Development Children's Health Infant and Preschool Learning Infant's Health Nutrition Parenting Pregnancy and Childbirth
Published

Even moderate alcohol usage during pregnancy linked to birth abnormalities      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers have found that even low to moderate alcohol use by pregnant patients may contribute to subtle changes in their babies' prenatal development, including lower birth length and a shorter duration of gestation.