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Categories: Fertility, Living Well

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Fertility Pregnancy and Childbirth
Published

Oocytes outsmart toxic proteins to preserve long-term female fertility      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

The accumulation of misfolded or damaged proteins in long-lived, non-dividing cells like neurons are linked to neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's. A study now finds that the build-up of these toxic proteins also influences oocyte quality and female fertility. The researchers discovered that mouse oocytes have specialized structures which roam the cytoplasm and act like a clean-up crew which capture and hold onto protein aggregates, rendering them harmless. Failure to degrade the toxic proteins led to the formation of defective eggs. 3 in 5 (60%) of mouse embryos that inherited the toxic proteins failed to complete the very earlies stages of development. The study presents a new frontier to explore the underlying mechanisms of poor oocyte quality, which is the leading cause of female infertility.

Fertility Pregnancy and Childbirth
Published

Scientists discover new target for reversible, non-hormonal male birth control      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Scientists discovered a new target for reversible, non-hormonal male birth control. The drug, an HDAC inhibitor, blocked sperm production and fertility in male mice without affecting libido or future reproduction.

Fertility
Published

What can bulls tell us about men?      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers have found genes in the reproductive organs of bulls that influence fertility. The findings can be transferred to humans, as these genes are also present in men.

Fertility Pregnancy and Childbirth
Published

Male fertility gene discovery reveals path to success for sperm      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

The discovery of a pair of genes that work in perfect harmony to protect male fertility could provide new insights into some unexplained cases of the most severe form of infertility, research suggests.

Child Development Living Well
Published

Great apes playfully tease each other      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Babies playfully tease others as young as eight months of age. Since language is not required for this behavior, similar kinds of playful teasing might be present in non-human animals. Now cognitive biologists and primatologists have documented playful teasing in four species of great apes. Like joking behavior in humans, ape teasing is provocative, persistent, and includes elements of surprise and play. Because all four great ape species used playful teasing, it is likely that the prerequisites for humor evolved in the human lineage at least 13 million years ago.

Children's Health Diet and Weight Loss Fertility Infant's Health Pregnancy and Childbirth
Published

Genetic cause of low birth weight among children conceived after fertility treatment      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A medical researcher has identified a genetic cause for the increased risk of low birth weight in babies born following assisted reproductive technologies such as IVF.

Living Well
Published

Smart earrings can monitor a person's temperature      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers introduced the Thermal Earring, a wireless wearable that continuously monitors a user's earlobe temperature. Potential applications include tracking signs of ovulation, stress, eating and exercise. The smart earring prototype is about the size and weight of a small paperclip and has a 28-day battery life.

Living Well
Published

How teachers make ethical judgments when using AI in the classroom      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A teacher's gender and comfort with technology factor into whether artificial intelligence is adopted in the classroom, as shown in a new report.

Fertility Healthy Aging Menopause Today's Healthcare Women's Health - General
Published

How ovarian tissue freezing could prevent menopause -- possibly forever      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A new paradigm around the biological processes of menopause is capturing the attention of scientists. The primary question: can menopause be delayed in healthy women, allowing them to extend their child-bearing years -- and perhaps even forestall some of the health risks and uncomfortable symptoms linked to plummeting estrogen levels?

Fertility
Published

Gene expression atlas captures where ovulation can go awry      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

An interdisciplinary collaboration used a cutting-edge form of RNA tagging to map the gene expression that occurs during follicle maturation and ovulation in mice.

Living Well
Published

Knowing what dogs like to watch could help veterinarians assess their vision      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A veterinary ophthalmologist wanted to determine factors, including age and vision, that influence a dog's interest in interacting with video content. Ultimately, the goal of the study, which launched two years ago, was to support development of more sensitive ways to assess canine vision -- something that has been sorely lacking in veterinary medicine. The study found that dogs are most engaged when watching videos that feature other animals.

Fertility Pregnancy and Childbirth
Published

Semen microbiome health may impact male fertility      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A new study finds that a small group of microorganisms may be influencing sperm motility.

Fertility Healthy Aging Pregnancy and Childbirth
Published

Surprise discovery: For most animals, sperm quality does not reduce with age      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

In humans, male fertility and sperm fitness decline with age, but scientists have made the surprising discovery that this pattern is not consistent in other animals. The team assessed the results of 379 studies which covered a wide range of animals, including mammals, insects, birds, and fish.

Chronic Illness Living Well
Published

Pain-based weather forecasts could influence actions      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

For individuals who experience chronic pain, weather can be a significant factor in their day-to-day plans. In a recent study, about 70 percent of respondents said they would alter their behavior based on weather-based pain forecasts.

Children's Health Fertility Healthy Aging Pregnancy and Childbirth
Published

Aging mouse sperm affects MicroRNA, increasing the risk of neurodevelopmental disorders      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Much is known about the added complication to pregnancy when it comes to the age of the mother, but recent studies show that the age of the father can also heighten the risk of neurodevelopmental disorders. A team of researchers has explored the impacts of paternal aging on microRNAs, the molecules that play a crucial role in regulating gene expression.

Living Well
Published

AI discovers that not every fingerprint is unique      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Engineers have built a new AI that shatters a long-held belief in forensics -- that fingerprints from different fingers of the same person are unique. It turns out they are similar, only we've been comparing fingerprints the wrong way!

Fertility Pregnancy and Childbirth Women's Health - General
Published

Infertility: Sperm need a breakthrough for fertilization      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A new study identifies the defective function of CatSper, an ion channel controlling calcium levels in sperm, as a common cause of seemingly unexplained male infertility. CatSper-deficient human sperm fail to fertilize the egg, because they cannot penetrate its protective vestments. Thus far, this sperm channelopathy has remained undetectable. Scientists have unravelled CatSper's role in infertility using a novel laboratory test that identifies affected men.

Fertility Pregnancy and Childbirth Today's Healthcare
Published

Preconception stress may affect health of women undergoing fertility treatment      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Stress during pregnancy is known to influence health outcomes, but a new study suggests that stress levels before pregnancy are also important to evaluate. Investigators analyzed the link between self-reported stress immediately before conception among women seeking fertility care and blood glucose levels, a marker of heart health. The team found that maternal stress during preconception was associated with higher blood glucose levels, especially among women using intrauterine insemination to conceive and women of higher socioeconomic status.

Fertility
Published

Nematode proteins shed light on infertility      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Biologists developed a method for illuminating the intricate interactions of the synaptonemal complex in the nematode C. elegans. The authors identified a trio of protein segments that guide chromosomal interactions, and pinpointed the location where they interact with each other. Their novel method uses a technique known as genetic suppressor screening, which can serve as a blueprint for research on large cellular assemblies that resist traditional structural analysis.

Fertility Hormone Disorders Psychology Research
Published

Brain cell discovery sparks hope for fertility treatments      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers have demonstrated how a specific type of neuron in the brain affects the release of hormones that control ovarian function in females. These findings could help researchers understand and treat reproductive disorders in both animals and humans.