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Categories: Fitness, Living Well

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Chronic Illness Fitness Today's Healthcare
Published

How data provided by fitness trackers and smartphones can help people with MS      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Monitoring and treating a case of multiple sclerosis requires reliable and long-term data on how the disease is progressing in the person in question. Fitness trackers and smartphones can supply this data, as a research team has now shown.

Diabetes Fitness
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Does the time of day you move your body make a difference to your health?      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Undertaking the majority of daily physical activity in the evening is linked to the greatest health benefits for people living with obesity, according to researchers who followed the trajectory of 30,000 people over almost 8 years.

Fitness
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Short-term incentives for exercise can lead to sustained increases in activity      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Adults with heart disease risks who received daily reminders or incentives to become more active increased their daily steps by more than 1,500 after a year, and many were still sticking with their new habit six months later, according to a new study.

Children's Health Fitness
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Low cardiorespiratory fitness in youth is associated with decreased work ability throughout adulthood      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A study confirms the concerns raised in the public domain about how young people's decreased fitness may affect their future work ability. The association of low youth cardiorespiratory fitness and adulthood decreased work ability persisted until the end of working life, which predicts substantial societal costs.

Fitness
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Exercise habits in youth create better health outcomes for some      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Forming a long-term recreational exercise habit as a young person has a beneficial impact on physical and mental health later in life, but some groups, such as females and academic high-achievers, miss out on these benefits disproportionately.

Chronic Illness Fitness Neuropathy Today's Healthcare
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Did you know that physical activity can protect you from chronic pain?      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Reserachers found that people who were more active in their free time had a lower chance of having various types of chronic pain 7-8 years later. For example, being just a little more active, such as going from light to moderate activity, was associated with a 5% lower risk of reporting some form of chronic pain later. For severe chronic pain in several places in the body, higher activity was associated with a 16% reduced risk. The researchers found that the ability to tolerate pain played a role in this apparent protective effect. That explains why being active could lower the risk of having severe chronic pain, whether or not it was widespread throughout the body.

Child Development Living Well
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A decade of aphantasia research: what we've learned about people who can't visualize      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

People who can't visualize an image in their mind's eye are less likely to remember the details of important past personal events or to recognize faces, according to a review of nearly ten years of research. People who cannot bring to mind visual imagery are also less likely to experience imagery of other kinds, like imagining music, according to new research by the academic who first discovered the phenomenon.

Child Development Children's Health Fitness
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The serious side of kid and canine play      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

With two-thirds of children in the U.S. failing to meet national physical activity guidelines, kinesiologistshave been looking at the impact of the family dog on the exercise habits of kids. Could having a canine best friend get kids on their feet and help bring them more in line with the minimum recommendation of 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity every day?

Fitness Today's Healthcare
Published

Pioneering muscle monitoring in space to help astronauts stay strong in low-gravity      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Astronauts have been able to track their muscle health in spaceflight for the first time using a handheld device, revealing which muscles are most at risk of weakening in low gravity conditions. Researchers monitored the muscle health of twelve astronauts before, during and after a stay on the International Space Station.

Fitness
Published

Cranberries provide runners with an all-natural boost, according to new research      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

In a series of trials involving trained distance runners, researchers found that ingesting a cranberry supplement for 28 consecutive days led to noticeable improvements in both performance and muscle fatigue following 1,500-metre time trials. Reoxygenation rates were faster and running speeds improved by 1.5 per cent. The researchers found that 28 days of cranberry extract consumption by elite level endurance runners demonstrated a trend toward increased speed in 1,500-metre time trials but not in 400-metre ones. However, they did notice that lactate buildup was reduced following the 400-metre but not the 1,500-metre compared to baseline. The data also indicated that the cranberry extract promoted better oxygen extraction by the muscle, improved lactate clearance and slower muscle deoxygenation.

Diet and Weight Loss Fitness
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Weight loss caused by common diabetes drug tied to 'anti-hunger' molecule in study      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A new study found that metformin, a commonly prescribed diabetes drug associated with moderate weight loss, stimulates production of lac-phe, a molecule abundant after exercise.

Fitness
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New strategy to facilitate muscle regeneration after injury      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Muscle injuries are common in the active population, and they cause the majority of player leaves in the world of sport. Depending on the severity, recovery of muscle function is quite slow and may require surgery, medication and rehabilitation. Now, a study reveals a strategy to improve and accelerate recovery from muscle injuries that has potential application in the sports and health sector in general.

Diabetes Diet and Weight Loss Fitness Obesity
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Kallistatin contributes to the beneficial metabolic effects of weight loss      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

After weight loss, people with overweight and obesity express more of the protein Kallistatin in subcutaneous white adipose tissue. Kallistatin improves metabolism and could open up new therapeutic options for people with obesity and type 2 diabetes in future.

Living Well
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It's hearty, it's meaty, it's mold      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Scientists are exploring how tuning the genomes of mushrooms and molds can transform these food sources into gourmet, nutrient-packed meals made with minimal processing and a light environmental footprint.

Living Well
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What kinds of seismic signals did Swifties send at LA concert?      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Seattle may have experienced its own Swift Quake last July, but at an August 2023 concert Taylor Swift's fans in Los Angeles gave scientists a lot of shaking to ponder. After some debate, a research team concluded that it was likely the dancing and jumping motions of the audience at SoFi Stadium -- not the musical beats or reverberations of the sound system -- that generated the concert's distinct harmonic tremors.

Living Well
Published

The surprising effect of presence hallucinations on social perception      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Neuroscientists have devised a way to alter our social perception and monitor specific types of hallucinations, both in healthy individuals and patients with Parkinson's disease. The test, which is also available online, provides the medical community with a tool to monitor hallucination susceptibility.

Living Well
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AI-generated food images look tastier than real ones      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers have announced an intriguing discovery -- consumers generally prefer AI-generated images of food over real food images, especially when they are unaware of their true nature.

Children's Health Diet and Weight Loss Fitness Nutrition Obesity
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Waist-to-height ratio detects fat obesity in children and adolescents significantly better than BMI      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

An inexpensive measure of obesity in children and adolescents that could replace body mass index (BMI) has been identified in a new study as waist circumference-to-height ratio. This measure detected excess fat mass and distinguished fat mass from muscle mass in children and adolescents more accurately than BMI.

Child Development Living Well
Published

Sprinting 'like a jet' will produce Premier League strikers of tomorrow, study shows      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Sprinting 'like a jet plane taking off' will help produce Premier League star strikers of tomorrow, new research has revealed. A new study of Tottenham Hotspur's academy has shown that just a few words can instantly boost sprinting speed by 3 per cent over 20 meters. It would normally take weeks of targeted training to achieve such a large increase.

Living Well
Published

Beyond the ink: Painting with physics      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Falling from the tip of a brush suspended in mid-air, an ink droplet touches a painted surface and blossoms into a masterpiece of ever-changing beauty. It weaves a tapestry of intricate, evolving patterns. Some of them resemble branching snowflakes, thunderbolts or neurons, whispering the unique expression of the artist's vision.