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Categories: Diabetes, Living Well

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Diabetes
Published

Sweet taste receptor affects how glucose is handled metabolically by humans      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

The sweet-taste receptor might be the first stop in a metabolic surveillance system for sugar. The receptor is also expressed in certain intestinal cells, where it may facilitate glucose absorption and assimilation, as part of this system. A team found that stimulation and inhibition of the sweet receptor helps regulate glucose metabolism in humans and may have implications for managing such metabolic disorders as diabetes.

Diabetes Obesity
Published

Two decades of studies suggest health benefits associated with plant-based diets      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Vegetarian and vegan diets are generally associated with better status on various medical factors linked to cardiovascular health and cancer risk, as well as lower risk of cardiovascular diseases, cancer, and death, according to a new review of 49 previously published papers.

Living Well
Published

Creating a green composite material from Japanese washi paper      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Japanese washi paper is renowned for its aesthetic beauty and its wide-array of usages. Now, a group of researchers have made a green composite material from washi which boasts a 60% increase in strength as well as being more biodegradable. They hope that their research will revive interest in this traditional craft.

Living Well
Published

Coming out to a chatbot?      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Today, there are dozens of large language model (LLM) chatbots aimed at mental health care -- addressing everything from loneliness among seniors to anxiety and depression in teens. But the efficacy of these apps is unclear. Even more unclear is how well these apps work in supporting specific, marginalized groups like LGBTQ+ communities.

Living Well
Published

Cats purrfectly demonstrate what it takes to trust robots      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Would you trust a robot to look after your cat? New research suggests it takes more than a carefully designed robot to care for your cat, the environment in which they operate is also vital, as well as human interaction.

Living Well
Published

AI systems are already skilled at deceiving and manipulating humans      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Many artificial intelligence (AI) systems have already learned how to deceive humans, even systems that have been trained to be helpful and honest. Researchers describe the risks of deception by AI systems and call for governments to develop strong regulations to address this issue as soon as possible.

Chronic Illness Diabetes
Published

How night shift work can raise risk of diabetes, obesity      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Just a few days on a night shift schedule throws off protein rhythms related to blood glucose regulation, energy metabolism and inflammation, processes that can influence the development of chronic metabolic conditions. The finding provides new clues as to why night shift workers are more prone to diabetes, obesity and other metabolic disorders. Though more research is needed, the researchers said the study shows that these disrupted rhythms can be seen in as little as three days, which suggests early intervention to prevent diabetes and obesity is possible. Such intervention could also help lower the risk of heart disease and stroke, which is elevated in night shift workers as well.

Living Well
Published

'Digital afterlife': Call for safeguards to prevent unwanted 'hauntings' by AI chatbots of dead loved ones      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers lay out the need for design safety protocols that prevent the emerging 'digital afterlife industry' causing social and psychological harm.

Diabetes Neuropathy Today's Healthcare
Published

Neuropathy very common, underdiagnosed      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Neuropathy, the nerve damage that causes pain and numbness in the feet and hands and can eventually lead to falls, infection and even amputation, is very common and underdiagnosed, according to a new study.

Diabetes
Published

Biomarker found to help identify cells that can repair damaged blood vessels      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers have discovered a protein marker to help identify cells able to repopulate in patients with damaged blood vessels. Their findings could lead to new therapies for people with endothelial dysfunction, a type of disorder that contributes to coronary artery disease that may occlude with plaque and lack ability to carry sufficient blood into the heart tissue causing a heart attack.

Diabetes
Published

Decoding the three ancestral components of the Japanese people      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A research group have used whole-genome sequencing to unravel the complex ancestry of the Japanese population. The analysis supports an earlier study that proposed that the Japanese population originated from admixtures of three ancestral groups, challenging the long-held dual-structure model.

Chronic Illness Diabetes Infant's Health Pregnancy and Childbirth
Published

Personalized screening early in pregnancy may improve preeclampsia detection      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Study suggests more extensive screening method in the first trimester of pregnancy may improve detection of preeclampsia.

Children's Health Diabetes Nutrition Obesity Psychology Research
Published

Researchers identify causal genetic variant linked to common childhood obesity      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers have identified a causal genetic variant strongly associated with childhood obesity. The study provides new insight into the importance of the hypothalamus of the brain and its role in common childhood obesity and the target gene may serve as a druggable target for future therapeutic interventions.

Living Well
Published

Time zones and tiredness strongly influence NBA results, study of 25,000 matches shows      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

The body clock has a significant impact on the performance of NBA players. Data shows vastly better win ratio for home teams from the Western Time Zone Area (PDT) when playing an EDT team, compared to vice versa.

Diabetes
Published

An electrifying discovery may help doctors deliver more effective gene therapies      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

In an effort to improve delivery of costly medical treatments, a team of researchers in electrical engineering has developed a stimulating method that could make the human body more receptive to certain gene therapies.

Chronic Illness Diabetes Diet and Weight Loss Nutrition
Published

Cranberry extracts could boost microbiota and counter cardiometabolic diseases      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Cranberry extracts appear to improve intestinal microbiota and help prevent chronic diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. The study reported beneficial effects after only four days of use.

Living Well
Published

One in eight grown-ups love extreme tartness      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

For most people, biting into a lemon would leave them puckered up and desperate to lose that sour flavor, but a new study revealed that roughly one in eight adults like intensely sour sensations. The cross-cultural study demonstrated there is a subset of 'sour likers' who enjoy exceptionally sour foods.

Diabetes
Published

Experimental type 1 diabetes drug shelters pancreas cells from immune system attack      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Scientists say that an experimental monoclonal antibody drug called mAb43 appears to prevent and reverse the onset of clinical type 1 diabetes in mice, and in some cases, to lengthen the animals' lifespan.

Living Well
Published

Fixin' to be flexitarian: Scrap fish and invasive species can liven up vegetables      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Greening the way we eat needn't mean going vegetarian. A healthy, more realistic solution is to adopt a flexitarian diet where seafoods add umami to 'boring' vegetables. A gastrophysicist puts mathematical equations to work in calculating the umami potential of everything from seaweed and shrimp paste to mussels and mackerel.

Diabetes
Published

Food in sight? The liver is ready!      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

What happens in the body when we are hungry and see and smell food? A team of researchers has now been able to show in mice that adaptations in the liver mitochondria take place after only a few minutes. Stimulated by the activation of a group of nerve cells in the brain, the mitochondria of the liver cells change and prepare the liver for the adaptation of the sugar metabolism. The findings could open up new avenues for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.