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Categories: Living Well, Women's Health - General

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Living Well
Published

Creating a green composite material from Japanese washi paper      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Japanese washi paper is renowned for its aesthetic beauty and its wide-array of usages. Now, a group of researchers have made a green composite material from washi which boasts a 60% increase in strength as well as being more biodegradable. They hope that their research will revive interest in this traditional craft.

Living Well
Published

Coming out to a chatbot?      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Today, there are dozens of large language model (LLM) chatbots aimed at mental health care -- addressing everything from loneliness among seniors to anxiety and depression in teens. But the efficacy of these apps is unclear. Even more unclear is how well these apps work in supporting specific, marginalized groups like LGBTQ+ communities.

Living Well
Published

Cats purrfectly demonstrate what it takes to trust robots      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Would you trust a robot to look after your cat? New research suggests it takes more than a carefully designed robot to care for your cat, the environment in which they operate is also vital, as well as human interaction.

Living Well
Published

AI systems are already skilled at deceiving and manipulating humans      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Many artificial intelligence (AI) systems have already learned how to deceive humans, even systems that have been trained to be helpful and honest. Researchers describe the risks of deception by AI systems and call for governments to develop strong regulations to address this issue as soon as possible.

Living Well
Published

'Digital afterlife': Call for safeguards to prevent unwanted 'hauntings' by AI chatbots of dead loved ones      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers lay out the need for design safety protocols that prevent the emerging 'digital afterlife industry' causing social and psychological harm.

Healthy Aging Women's Health - General
Published

Could getting enough sleep help prevent osteoporosis?      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

In people's early- to mid-20s, they reach what is called peak bone mineral density, which is higher for men than it is for women, according to researchers. This peak is one of the main determinants of fracture risk later in life. After reaching this peak, a person's bone density remains roughly stable for a couple of decades. Then, when women enter the menopausal transition, they experience accelerated bone loss. Men also experience bone density decline as they age. Sleep patterns also evolve over time.

Depression Menopause Mental Health Research Women's Health - General
Published

Women are 40% more likely to experience depression during the perimenopause      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Women are 40% more likely to experience depression in the perimenopause than those who aren't experiencing any menopausal symptoms, finds a new study.

Living Well
Published

Time zones and tiredness strongly influence NBA results, study of 25,000 matches shows      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

The body clock has a significant impact on the performance of NBA players. Data shows vastly better win ratio for home teams from the Western Time Zone Area (PDT) when playing an EDT team, compared to vice versa.

Living Well
Published

One in eight grown-ups love extreme tartness      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

For most people, biting into a lemon would leave them puckered up and desperate to lose that sour flavor, but a new study revealed that roughly one in eight adults like intensely sour sensations. The cross-cultural study demonstrated there is a subset of 'sour likers' who enjoy exceptionally sour foods.

Living Well
Published

Fixin' to be flexitarian: Scrap fish and invasive species can liven up vegetables      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Greening the way we eat needn't mean going vegetarian. A healthy, more realistic solution is to adopt a flexitarian diet where seafoods add umami to 'boring' vegetables. A gastrophysicist puts mathematical equations to work in calculating the umami potential of everything from seaweed and shrimp paste to mussels and mackerel.

Women's Health - General
Published

Breast cancer rates rising among Canadian women in their 20s, 30s and 40s      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Rates of breast cancer in women under the age of 50 are rising in Canada according to a study which showed an increase in breast cancer diagnoses among females in their twenties, thirties, and forties.

Birth Defects Women's Health - General
Published

Gene-based therapy restores cellular development and function in brain cells from people with Timothy syndrome      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

In a proof-of-concept study, researchers demonstrated the effectiveness of a potential new therapy for Timothy syndrome, an often life-threatening and rare genetic disorder that affects a wide range of bodily systems, leading to severe cardiac, neurological, and psychiatric symptoms as well as physical differences such as webbed fingers and toes.

Living Well
Published

A university lecture, with a dash of jumping jacks      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A university professor has found a way to help students -- and himself -- power through long lecture classes: exercise breaks. A new study showed that five-minute exercise sessions during lectures were feasible and that students reported positive impacts on their attention and motivation, engagement with their peers and course enjoyment.

Living Well
Published

Hey Dave, I've got an idea for you: What's the potential of AI-led workshopping?      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Sure, ChatGPT can write a poem about your pet in the style of T.S Eliot, but generative artificial intelligence (AI) chatbots have a potentially more useful role to play in idea generation according to a new study.

Psychology Research Women's Health - General
Published

Glial hyper-drive for triggering epileptic seizures      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

When epileptic patients suffer seizures, their brain is undergoing repetitive and excessive neuronal firing. But what triggers this has stumped scientists for years. Now, researchers have used fluorescence calcium sensors to track astrocytes' role in epileptic seizures, finding that that astrocyte activity starts approximately 20 seconds before the onset of epileptic neuronal hyperactivity.

Women's Health - General
Published

Next-generation treatments hitch a ride into cancer cells      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers found that a new activator called L687 induces cancer cells to accept delivery of antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) drugs. These drugs can treat cancer by blocking the transfer of messages from genes that encourage cancer growth. Previous methods to deliver ASOs into cells had only limited success. This research will help accelerate the development and delivery of novel ASO cancer therapies.

Today's Healthcare Women's Health - General
Published

Nasal spray safely treats recurrent abnormal heart rhythms, clinical trial suggests      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A clinical trial showed that a nasal spray that patients administer at home, without a physician, successfully and safely treated recurrent episodes of a condition that causes rapid abnormal heart rhythms. The study provides real-world evidence that a wide range of patients can safely and effectively use the experimental drug, called etripamil, to treat recurrent paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT) episodes at home, potentially sparing them the need for repeated hospital trips for more invasive treatments.

Women's Health - General
Published

'Exhausted' immune cells in healthy women could be target for breast cancer prevention      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

People carrying BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations are at high risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer. Researchers have found that changes occur in the immune cells of breast tissue in carriers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations long before breast cancer develops. This raises the possibility of early intervention to prevent the disease, as an alternative to risk-reduction surgery. Drugs already approved for late-stage breast cancer treatment could reactivate the faulty immune cells and keep the breast cells healthy. If successful in mouse models, this preventative therapeutic approach could pave the way for clinical trials in human carriers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations.

Child Development Living Well
Published

A decade of aphantasia research: what we've learned about people who can't visualize      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

People who can't visualize an image in their mind's eye are less likely to remember the details of important past personal events or to recognize faces, according to a review of nearly ten years of research. People who cannot bring to mind visual imagery are also less likely to experience imagery of other kinds, like imagining music, according to new research by the academic who first discovered the phenomenon.

Women's Health - General
Published

In the fight against breast cancer, researchers identify malignancy hibernation as the next battleground      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

There is a surprising dearth of research about how breast cancer cells can go dormant, spread and then resurface years or even decades later, according to a new review of in vitro breast cancer studies.