Showing 20 articles starting at article 1

Next 20 articles >

Categories: Chronic Illness, Today's Healthcare

Return to the site home page

Chronic Illness Healthy Aging
Published

The vicious cycle of protein clumping in Alzheimer's disease and normal aging      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

To date, approaches to treatments for Alzheimer's disease have not addressed the contribution of protein insolubility as a general phenomenon, instead focusing on one or two insoluble proteins. Researchers have recently completed a systematic study in worms that paints an intricate picture of the connections between insoluble proteins in neurodegenerative diseases and aging. Furthermore, the work demonstrated an intervention that could reverse the toxic effects of the aggregates by boosting mitochondrial health.

Today's Healthcare
Published

Researchers wrestle with accuracy of AI technology used to create new drug candidates      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers have determined that a protein prediction technology can yield accurate results in the hunt to efficiently find the best possible drug candidates for many conditions.

Chronic Illness
Published

New gene delivery vehicle shows promise for human brain gene therapy      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

In an important step toward more effective gene therapies for brain diseases, researchers have engineered a gene-delivery vehicle that uses a human protein to efficiently cross the blood-brain barrier and deliver a disease-relevant gene to the brain in mice expressing the human protein. Because the vehicle binds to a well-studied protein in the blood-brain barrier, the scientists say it has a good chance at working in patients.

Chronic Illness
Published

Celiac disease: New findings on the effects of gluten      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Celiac disease is a chronic autoimmune condition that occurs in around one per cent of the world's population. It is triggered by the consumption of gluten proteins from wheat, barley, rye and some oats. A gluten-free diet protects celiac patients from severe intestinal damage.

Psychology Research Today's Healthcare
Published

Very early blood pressure control confers both benefits and harms in acute stroke      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Early identification of stroke type could be key to harnessing the benefits of very early in-ambulance blood pressure lowering treatment in patients with suspected acute stroke, according to new research.

Today's Healthcare
Published

Blood pressure drugs more than double bone-fracture risk in nursing home patients      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

New research finds a link between common medications and life-threatening injuries.

Today's Healthcare
Published

Pre- and post-surgical immunotherapy improves outcomes for patients with operable lung cancer      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Compared with pre-surgical (neoadjuvant) chemotherapy alone, adding perioperative immunotherapy -- given before and after surgery -- significantly improved event-free survival (EFS) in patients with resectable early-stage non-small cell lung cancer(NSCLC), according to researchers.

Fertility Today's Healthcare
Published

Infertility treatment doubles the risk of postpartum heart disease      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers tie infertility treatment to a particular risk for hypertensive diseases.

Today's Healthcare
Published

Exploring the mechanism behind drug eruptions in the skin      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Although drug eruptions are often linked to the human leukocyte antigen (HLA), the mechanism of its involvement in presenting symptoms of the skin remains unclear. In a recent study, researchers used genetically engineered mice to demonstrate the role of HLA in mediating intracellular reactions in keratinocytes, leading to drug eruptions in the skin. Their findings could lead to improved preventive and treatment measures for drug eruptions.

Chronic Illness Obesity
Published

Fighting fat and inflammation: Scientists develop powerful new compounds      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Obesity and inflammatory diseases are increasing in prevalence and contribute to the growing burden of lifestyle disorders such as diabetes and hypertension. There is a lack of naturally derived alternatives to tackle these issues. Researchers have synthesized novel amino acid derivatives of menthol and studied its properties. The menthyl esters showed exceptional anti-inflammatory and anti-obesity activities during preclinical studies and can be developed as therapeutic compounds with further research.

Today's Healthcare
Published

New cardiac research will save women's lives by improving detection of heart failure      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

An important new study has advanced how heart failure is detected in women -- meaning more female patients can be diagnosed and at an earlier stage.

Skin Care Today's Healthcare
Published

Robots' and prosthetic hands' sense of touch could be as fast as humans      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Research could pave the way for a prosthetic hand and robot to be able to feel touch like a human hand. The technology could also be used to help restore lost functionality to patients after a stroke.

Chronic Illness
Published

Drug compounds to combat neurodegenerative diseases      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Prions are the abnormal, pathogenic agents that are transmissible and are able to induce abnormal folding of specific normal cellular proteins. Prion disease is an umbrella term for a group of fatal and currently untreatable neurodegenerative diseases that not only affect humans, but also wild and captive animals. These diseases include Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in humans, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE, or 'mad cow disease'), and chronic wasting disease (CWD) affecting deer, elk and moose.

Today's Healthcare
Published

The doctor is in.... but what's behind them?      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Americans have gotten used to seeing their doctors and other health care providers using telehealth video visits in the past four years. But a new study reveals that what a doctor has behind them during a telehealth visit can make a difference in how the patient feels about them and their care.

Today's Healthcare
Published

New transit station in Japan significantly reduced cumulative health expenditures      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A research team assessed the impact of a train station's opening on health expenditures. The natural experiment study revealed that a new mass transit station is significantly associated with decreased average health expenditures per capita.

Today's Healthcare
Published

Artificial intelligence tool to improve heart failure care      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

The powerful new AI tool can predict heart failure outcomes in specific patients, helping doctors improve care.

Today's Healthcare
Published

Newly identified PET biomarker predicts success of immune checkpoint blockade therapy      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

The protein galectin-1 (Gal-1) has been identified as a new PET imaging biomarker for immune checkpoint blockade (ICB) therapy, allowing physicians to predict the tumor responses before beginning treatment. Information garnered from Gal-1 PET imaging could also be used to facilitate patient stratification and optimize immunotherapy, enabling targeted interventions and improving patient outcomes.

Psychology Research Today's Healthcare
Published

Innovative 'mini-brains' could revolutionize Alzheimer's treatment      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

New research could revolutionize the way Alzheimer's and other brain-related diseases are diagnosed and treated -- by building tiny brains in a petri dish.

Today's Healthcare
Published

Commonly used antibiotic brings more complications, death in the sickest patients      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Treatment with the commonly used antibiotic piperacillin/tazobactam was associated with a 5 percent increase in 90-day mortality, more days on a ventilator, and more time with organ failure for patients with sepsis, finds a new study.

Psychology Research Today's Healthcare
Published

Study reveals patients with brain injuries who died after withdrawal of life support may have recovered      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Analysis of 1,392 patients with traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) found that some patients for whom life support was withdrawn may have survived and recovered some level of independence a few months after injury. Families are often asked to make decision to withdraw life support within 72 hours of a brain injury, and the new study suggests delaying decisions may be beneficial for some patients.