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Child Development Living Well
Published

AI outperforms humans in standardized tests of creative potential      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

In a recent study, 151 human participants were pitted against ChatGPT-4 in three tests designed to measure divergent thinking, which is considered to be an indicator of creative thought.

Living Well
Published

Researchers overestimate their own honesty      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

The average researcher thinks they are better than their colleagues at following good research practice. They also think that their own research field is better than other research fields at following good research practice. The results point to a risk of becoming blind to one's own shortcomings.

Cosmetic Surgery Cosmetics Healthy Aging Skin Care
Published

Turning back the clock on photoaging skin      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A new study examines dermal injections and their impact on skin aging.

Child Development Living Well
Published

Great apes playfully tease each other      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Babies playfully tease others as young as eight months of age. Since language is not required for this behavior, similar kinds of playful teasing might be present in non-human animals. Now cognitive biologists and primatologists have documented playful teasing in four species of great apes. Like joking behavior in humans, ape teasing is provocative, persistent, and includes elements of surprise and play. Because all four great ape species used playful teasing, it is likely that the prerequisites for humor evolved in the human lineage at least 13 million years ago.

Living Well
Published

Smart earrings can monitor a person's temperature      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers introduced the Thermal Earring, a wireless wearable that continuously monitors a user's earlobe temperature. Potential applications include tracking signs of ovulation, stress, eating and exercise. The smart earring prototype is about the size and weight of a small paperclip and has a 28-day battery life.

Living Well
Published

How teachers make ethical judgments when using AI in the classroom      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A teacher's gender and comfort with technology factor into whether artificial intelligence is adopted in the classroom, as shown in a new report.

Living Well
Published

Knowing what dogs like to watch could help veterinarians assess their vision      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A veterinary ophthalmologist wanted to determine factors, including age and vision, that influence a dog's interest in interacting with video content. Ultimately, the goal of the study, which launched two years ago, was to support development of more sensitive ways to assess canine vision -- something that has been sorely lacking in veterinary medicine. The study found that dogs are most engaged when watching videos that feature other animals.

Chronic Illness Living Well
Published

Pain-based weather forecasts could influence actions      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

For individuals who experience chronic pain, weather can be a significant factor in their day-to-day plans. In a recent study, about 70 percent of respondents said they would alter their behavior based on weather-based pain forecasts.

Alternative Medicine Cosmetic Surgery Cosmetics Skin Care
Published

A more eco-friendly facial sheet mask that moisturizes, even though it's packaged dry      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Starting a new year, many people pledge to enact self-care routines that improve their appearance. And facial sheet masks soaked in skin care ingredients provide an easy way to do this. However, these wet masks and their waterproof packaging often contain plastics and preservatives. Now, a study reports a dry-packaged hydrating facial mask that is made of biobased and sustainable materials.

Living Well
Published

AI discovers that not every fingerprint is unique      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Engineers have built a new AI that shatters a long-held belief in forensics -- that fingerprints from different fingers of the same person are unique. It turns out they are similar, only we've been comparing fingerprints the wrong way!

Living Well Psychology Research
Published

Sniffing women's tears reduces aggressive behavior in men, researchers report      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

New research shows that tears from women contain chemicals that block aggression in men. The study finds that sniffing tears leads to reduced brain activity related to aggression, which results is less aggressive behavior.

Living Well
Published

Artificial intelligence can predict events in people's lives      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Artificial intelligence can analyze registry data on people's residence, education, income, health and working conditions and, with high accuracy, predict life events.

Living Well Nutrition
Published

AI study reveals individuality of tongue's surface      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Artificial Intelligence (AI) and 3D images of the human tongue have revealed that the surface of our tongues are unique to each of us, new findings suggest. The results offer an unprecedented insight into the biological make-up of our tongue's surface and how our sense of taste and touch differ from person to person.

Living Well
Published

ChatGPT often won't defend its answers -- even when it is right      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

ChatGPT may do an impressive job at correctly answering complex questions, but a new study suggests it may be absurdly easy to convince the AI chatbot that it's in the wrong.

Living Well
Published

Many couples around the world may share high blood pressure      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Spouses or partners in heterosexual relationships may have high blood pressure that mirrors one another, finds new, multinational study.

Infant's Health Living Well Today's Healthcare
Published

Wearables capture body sounds to continuously monitor health      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

From heart beats to stomach gurgles, sounds hold important health information. New wireless devices sit on skin to continuously capture these sounds, then stream data to smartphones or tablets in real time. In pilot studies, devices accurately tracked sounds associated with cardiorespiratory function, gastrointestinal activity, swallowing and respiration. The devices are particularly valuable for premature babies, who can experience apneas and gastrointestinal complications, which are accompanied by sounds.

Cosmetics Skin Care
Published

Scientists 3D-print hair follicles in lab-grown skin      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Scientists have 3D-printed hair follicles in human skin tissue cultured in the lab. This marks the first time researchers have used the technology to generate hair follicles, which play an important role in skin healing and function. When it comes to engineering human skin, hair may at first seem superfluous. However, hair follicles are quite important: They produce sweat, helping regulate body temperature, and they contain stem cells that help skin heal. The finding has potential applications in regenerative medicine and drug testing, though engineering skin grafts that grow hair are still several years away.  

Living Well
Published

When we see what others do, our brain sees not what we see, but what we expect      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

When we engage in social interactions, like shaking hands or having a conversation, our observation of other people's actions is crucial. But what exactly happens in our brain during this process: how do the different brain regions talk to each other? Researchers provide an intriguing answer: our perception of what others do depends more on what we expect to happen than previously believed. 

Child Development Living Well
Published

New AI noise-canceling headphone technology lets wearers pick which sounds they hear      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers have developed deep-learning algorithms that let users pick which sounds filter through their headphones in real time. Either through voice commands or a smartphone app, headphone wearers can select which sounds they want to include from 20 classes, such as sirens, baby cries, speech, vacuum cleaners and bird chirps.

Living Well
Published

How animals get their stripes and spots      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

New research helps explain how sharp patterns form on zebras, leopards, tropical fish and other creatures. Their findings could inform the development of new high-tech materials and drugs.