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Categories: Infant's Health, Relationships

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Relationships
Published

When saying 'please' is more strategic than magic      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

By kindergarten age, most children have been taught that 'please' is a magic word. 'Please' is an expression of politeness that shows courtesy and respect, turning a potential demand into a request that will -- poof! -- magically be granted. But a new study on the ways people make requests of one another suggests that 'please' might not be an all-purpose marker of politeness, but rather a more focused, strategic tool to manage frictions or obstacles among family members, friends and even coworkers. The study shows that people say 'please' much less often than expected, and mostly when they expect a 'no' response is forthcoming.

Children's Health Infant's Health Pregnancy and Childbirth
Published

Birth by C-section more than doubles odds of measles vaccine failure      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Birth by C-section more than doubles odds of measles vaccine failure. Researchers say it is vital that children born by caesarean section receive two doses of the measles vaccine for robust protection against the disease.

Relationships
Published

AI intervention mitigates tension among conflicting ethnic groups      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

While intergroup interaction is a prerequisite for initiating peace and stability, there is the risk of further escalation from direct interactions. A shortage of an impartial electronic contact session may cause the process to become destabilized. Interactive AI programs may help reduce prejudice and anxiety among historically divided ethnic groups in Afghanistan during online interactions.

Birth Defects Child Development Children's Health Infant's Health
Published

Metabolism of autism reveals developmental origins      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers have shed new light on the changes in metabolism that occur between birth and the presentation of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) later in childhood. The researchers discovered that a small number of biochemical pathways are responsible for the majority of these changes, which could help inform new early detection and prevention strategies for autism.

Child Development Infant's Health Parenting
Published

THC lingers in breastmilk with no clear peak point      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

When breastfeeding mothers in a recent study used cannabis, its psychoactive component THC showed up in the milk they produced. The research also found that, unlike alcohol, when THC was detected in milk there was no consistent time when its concentration peaked and started to decline. Importantly, the researchers discovered that the amount of THC they detected in milk was low -- they estimated that infants received an average of 0.07 mg of THC per day. For comparison, a common low-dose edible contains 2 mg of THC. The research team stressed that it is unknown whether this amount has any impact on the infant.

Breastfeeding Infant's Health Pregnancy and Childbirth
Published

A new mother's immune status varies with her feeding strategy      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

In one of the first studies of its kind, UC Santa Barbara researchers have found that the immune status of postpartum mothers shifts with how she feeds her baby. Certain inflammatory proteins -- substances that are secreted as part of an immune response -- peak at different times of day, correlating with whether the mothers breastfeed, pump or formula-feed their babies.

Birth Defects Child Development Children's Health Infant's Health Psychology Research
Published

Genetics, not lack of oxygen, causes cerebral palsy in quarter of cases      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

The world's largest study of cerebral palsy (CP) genetics has discovered genetic defects are most likely responsible for more than a quarter of cases in Chinese children, rather than a lack of oxygen at birth as previously thought.

Chronic Illness Diabetes Infant's Health Pregnancy and Childbirth
Published

Personalized screening early in pregnancy may improve preeclampsia detection      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Study suggests more extensive screening method in the first trimester of pregnancy may improve detection of preeclampsia.

Relationships
Published

Physics confirms that the enemy of your enemy is, indeed, your friend      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

The famous axiom 'the enemy of my enemy is my friend' is part of Austrian psychologist Fritz Heider's social balance theory, introduced in the 1940s. Previous studies have tried to model social networks based in famous theory but results remained controversial. New model takes into account two key pieces simultaneously: Not everyone knows everyone else in a social network, and some people are friendlier than others. With those two constraints, large-scale social networks consistently align with social balance theory. Model has broad applications for exploring political polarization, neural networks, drug interactions and more.

Relationships
Published

Social-media break has huge impact on young women's body image, study finds      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

There's a large and growing body of evidence pointing to potentially negative impacts of social media on mental health, from its addictive nature to disruptions in sleep patterns to effects on body image. Now, a new study has found that young women who took a social media break for as little as one week had a significant boost in self-esteem and body image -- particularly those most vulnerable to thin-ideal internalization.

Relationships
Published

Loneliness grows as we age      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Loneliness in adulthood follows a U-shaped pattern: it's higher in younger and older adulthood, and lowest during middle adulthood, reports a new study that examined nine longitudinal studies from around the world. The study also identified several risk factors for heightened loneliness across the whole lifespan, including social isolation, education and physical impairment.

Infant's Health
Published

AI algorithms can determine how well newborns nurse, study shows      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A modified pacifier and AI algorithms to analyze the data it produces could determine if newborns are learning the proper mechanics of nursing, a recent study shows. Specifically, the researchers measured if babies are generating enough suckling strength to breastfeed and whether they are suckling in a regular pattern based on eight independent parameters.

Infant's Health Today's Healthcare
Published

New tool helps identify babies at high-risk for RSV      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A new tool to identify infants most at risk for severe respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) illness could aid pediatricians in prioritizing children under 1 to receive a preventive medication before RSV season (October-April), according to new research.

Relationships
Published

Don't be a stranger -- study finds rekindling old friendships as scary as making new ones      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Psychologists have found that people are as hesitant to reach out to an old friend as they are to strike up a conversation with a stranger, even when they had the capacity and desire to do so.

Children's Health Infant's Health Pregnancy and Childbirth
Published

Dengue fever infections have negative impacts on infant health for three years      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Dengue infections in pregnant women may have a negative impact on the first years of children's lives, new research has found.

Relationships
Published

Exploring brain synchronization patterns during social interactions      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Social interactions synchronize brain activity within individuals and between individuals. In a new study, researchers compared brain synchronization between pairs of people with relatively strong social ties (acquaintance pairs) and pairs with almost no social ties (stranger pairs). The study found that during a cooperative task, the stranger pairs exhibited more closely connected brain networks compared to the acquaintance pairs. These findings challenge the conventional understanding that stronger social bonds lead to greater brain synchronization.

Chronic Illness Diabetes Infant's Health
Published

Follow-up 50 years on finds landmark steroid study remains safe      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A follow-up analysis 50 years later finds no adverse heart health risk from Professor Mont Liggins' landmark steroid study to reduce illness and death for pre-term babies.

Child Development Children's Health Chronic Illness Infant's Health Parenting
Published

Study finds COVID-19 pandemic led to some, but not many, developmental milestone delays in infants and young children      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Infants and children 5 years old and younger experienced only 'modest' delays in developmental milestones due to the COVID-19 pandemic disruptions and restrictions, a study finds.

Child Development Children's Health Infant's Health Parenting
Published

Bacteria behind meningitis in babies explained      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers have identified the types of E.coli responsible for neonatal meningitis -- around 50 per cent of infections are caused by two types of E. coli. The study was the largest to date, examining genomes of E. coli bacteria across four continents. The research also revealed why some infections recur despite being treated with antibiotics -- it's most likely that bacteria hide out in the intestinal microbiome. This information tells us that we need to keep monitoring these babies after their first infection, as they are at a high risk of subsequent infections.

Depression Infant's Health Mental Health Research Parenting Psychology Research
Published

Teen stress may raise risk of postpartum depression in adults      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A research team reports that social stress during adolescence in female mice later results in prolonged elevation of the hormone cortisol after they give birth.