Showing 20 articles starting at article 1

Next 20 articles >

Categories: Fertility, Living Well

Return to the site home page

Fertility Today's Healthcare
Published

Infertility treatment doubles the risk of postpartum heart disease      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers tie infertility treatment to a particular risk for hypertensive diseases.

Living Well
Published

Creating a green composite material from Japanese washi paper      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Japanese washi paper is renowned for its aesthetic beauty and its wide-array of usages. Now, a group of researchers have made a green composite material from washi which boasts a 60% increase in strength as well as being more biodegradable. They hope that their research will revive interest in this traditional craft.

Living Well
Published

Coming out to a chatbot?      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Today, there are dozens of large language model (LLM) chatbots aimed at mental health care -- addressing everything from loneliness among seniors to anxiety and depression in teens. But the efficacy of these apps is unclear. Even more unclear is how well these apps work in supporting specific, marginalized groups like LGBTQ+ communities.

Living Well
Published

Cats purrfectly demonstrate what it takes to trust robots      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Would you trust a robot to look after your cat? New research suggests it takes more than a carefully designed robot to care for your cat, the environment in which they operate is also vital, as well as human interaction.

Living Well
Published

AI systems are already skilled at deceiving and manipulating humans      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Many artificial intelligence (AI) systems have already learned how to deceive humans, even systems that have been trained to be helpful and honest. Researchers describe the risks of deception by AI systems and call for governments to develop strong regulations to address this issue as soon as possible.

Living Well
Published

'Digital afterlife': Call for safeguards to prevent unwanted 'hauntings' by AI chatbots of dead loved ones      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers lay out the need for design safety protocols that prevent the emerging 'digital afterlife industry' causing social and psychological harm.

Living Well
Published

Time zones and tiredness strongly influence NBA results, study of 25,000 matches shows      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

The body clock has a significant impact on the performance of NBA players. Data shows vastly better win ratio for home teams from the Western Time Zone Area (PDT) when playing an EDT team, compared to vice versa.

Fertility Pregnancy and Childbirth
Published

Discovery of an atypical heat shock factor, HSF5, involved in meiotic mechanisms: Implications for male infertility      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers have identified a novel Heat Shock Factor (HSF), designated as HSF5, which plays a crucial role in the completion of meiosis and the activation of genes essential for sperm formation. This discovery provides valuable insights into underlying causes of spermatogenic failure, the major contributor to male infertility. Furthermore, unlike other typical Heat Shock Factors, which primarily regulate gene expression in response to stress, such as heat shock, HSF5 plays a specific role in male germ production during meiosis under non-stress conditions.

Living Well
Published

One in eight grown-ups love extreme tartness      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

For most people, biting into a lemon would leave them puckered up and desperate to lose that sour flavor, but a new study revealed that roughly one in eight adults like intensely sour sensations. The cross-cultural study demonstrated there is a subset of 'sour likers' who enjoy exceptionally sour foods.

Living Well
Published

Fixin' to be flexitarian: Scrap fish and invasive species can liven up vegetables      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Greening the way we eat needn't mean going vegetarian. A healthy, more realistic solution is to adopt a flexitarian diet where seafoods add umami to 'boring' vegetables. A gastrophysicist puts mathematical equations to work in calculating the umami potential of everything from seaweed and shrimp paste to mussels and mackerel.

Living Well
Published

A university lecture, with a dash of jumping jacks      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A university professor has found a way to help students -- and himself -- power through long lecture classes: exercise breaks. A new study showed that five-minute exercise sessions during lectures were feasible and that students reported positive impacts on their attention and motivation, engagement with their peers and course enjoyment.

Living Well
Published

Hey Dave, I've got an idea for you: What's the potential of AI-led workshopping?      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Sure, ChatGPT can write a poem about your pet in the style of T.S Eliot, but generative artificial intelligence (AI) chatbots have a potentially more useful role to play in idea generation according to a new study.

Fertility Today's Healthcare
Published

New consensus statement aims to improve endometriosis evaluation      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A new expert consensus statement aims to improve endometriosis evaluation. Endometriosis is a common condition with substantial diagnostic delay, leading patients to experience pain, infertility, lost wages and interrupted relationships. The consensus provides recommendations for augmenting routine pelvic ultrasounds through additional maneuvers and imaging to improve diagnosis of deep endometriosis.

Fertility
Published

The surprising connection between male infertility and family cancer risk      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A study suggests families with infertile male relatives may face elevated cancer risks. Tapping into genetic data, families could help personalize cancer risk assessments.

Child Development Living Well
Published

A decade of aphantasia research: what we've learned about people who can't visualize      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

People who can't visualize an image in their mind's eye are less likely to remember the details of important past personal events or to recognize faces, according to a review of nearly ten years of research. People who cannot bring to mind visual imagery are also less likely to experience imagery of other kinds, like imagining music, according to new research by the academic who first discovered the phenomenon.

Fertility
Published

Researchers uncover protein interactions controlling fertility in female mice      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers have shed light on the proteins controlling the development of ovaries in mice before and after birth. This could lead to a better understanding of how female infertility develops.

Living Well
Published

It's hearty, it's meaty, it's mold      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Scientists are exploring how tuning the genomes of mushrooms and molds can transform these food sources into gourmet, nutrient-packed meals made with minimal processing and a light environmental footprint.

Fertility Pregnancy and Childbirth
Published

New discovery reveals how the egg controls sperm entry      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

After the egg has been fertilized by a sperm, the surrounding egg coat tightens, mechanically preventing the entry of additional sperm and the ensuing death of the embryo, a new study finds. The work also explains how mutations in egg coat proteins can cause female infertility and may eventually lead to new contraceptive methods.

Living Well
Published

What kinds of seismic signals did Swifties send at LA concert?      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Seattle may have experienced its own Swift Quake last July, but at an August 2023 concert Taylor Swift's fans in Los Angeles gave scientists a lot of shaking to ponder. After some debate, a research team concluded that it was likely the dancing and jumping motions of the audience at SoFi Stadium -- not the musical beats or reverberations of the sound system -- that generated the concert's distinct harmonic tremors.

Fertility
Published

Tsetse fly fertility damaged after just one heatwave, study finds      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

The fertility of both female and male tsetse flies is affected by a single burst of hot weather, researchers have found.