Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Chronic Illness Today's Healthcare
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Chronic fatigue syndrome: Number of patients is expected to double due to long-term effects of the COVID-19 pandemic      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

The number of ME/CFS patients is expected to rise drastically due to long-term effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. Scientists have now identified possible biomarkers that could improve the diagnosis and treatment of long-lasting and debilitating fatigue.

Healthy Aging Today's Healthcare
Published

New epigenetic clocks reinvent how we measure age      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Investigators unveil a new form of epigenetic clock -- a machine learning model designed to predict biological age from DNA structure.

Today's Healthcare
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A new test could predict how heart attack patients will respond to mechanical pumps      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers discovered why ventricular assist devices (VADs) used to support the left ventricle of cardiogenic shock patients can induce right ventricle dysfunction. They also developed a test that doctors could use to determine whether this dysfunction will occur.

Today's Healthcare
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Treating liver cancer with microrobots piloted by a magnetic field      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers have developed a novel approach to treat liver tumors using magnet-guided microrobots in an MRI device.

Today's Healthcare
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New understanding of avian eggshell attachment -- implications for medical procedures and egg industry      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Athletes often suffer injuries to ligaments in their knees, particularly to the anterior cruciate ligament or ACL. While surgery to replace these torn ligaments is becoming increasingly common around the world it often needs to be repeated. That's because it has proved challenging to anchor fibrous, soft and wet ligament grafting material into hard bone. Now, researchers have new information from the eggshell membrane in chicken eggs that could help change this picture thanks to the potential it offers for improvements in tissue engineering and biomaterial grafts. Their findings also have the potential to reduce losses for commercial egg and poultry producers.

Today's Healthcare
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Nanoparticles that can light up the lymph node cancer cells otherwise undetectable by MRI      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers have developed a new nanoparticle that can 'hitch a ride' on immune cells, or monocytes. Because of its tiny size, the particle can tag along directly into lymph nodes and help metastasis show up on MRIs where it would otherwise be too hard to detect. The process offers game-changing benefits for the early detection of cancer metastasis in the lymph nodes. While previously, metastasis could only be assessed by an increase in lymph node size; the new particles could lead to MRI contrast agents that can highlight metastatic cells in lymph nodes that may otherwise appear normal.

Today's Healthcare
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Biomarker-directed combination effective in immunotherapy-resistant lung cancer      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A specific combination of targeted therapy and immunotherapy may better help patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) overcome inherent immune resistance and reinvigorate anti-tumor activity, according to a new study.

Today's Healthcare
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Better diagnosis and treatment of cryptococcosis      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A global guideline for the management of cryptococcosis, a fungal infection that can have serious health consequences, has been developed.

Today's Healthcare
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Salt substitutes help to maintain healthy blood pressure in older adults      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

The replacement of regular salt with a salt substitute can reduce incidences of hypertension, or high blood pressure, in older adults without increasing their risk of low blood pressure episodes, according to a recent study. People who used a salt substitute had a 40% lower incidence and likelihood of experiencing hypertension compared to those who used regular salt.

Today's Healthcare
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A standard blood test can predict a heart attack      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Using the results of a standard blood test and an online tool, you can find out if you are at increased risk of having a heart attack within six months.

Today's Healthcare
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An ultrasound sticker senses changing stiffness of deep internal organs      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A small ultrasound sticker, worn on the skin, can monitor the stiffness of organs deep inside the body. The sensor could detect signs of disease such as liver and kidney failure, and the progression of solid tumors.

Today's Healthcare
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New tumor spatial mapping tool will help clinicians assess aggressiveness of cancer and personalize treatment      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

FuncOmap directly maps the functional states of oncoproteins in patients' tumour sections, so that clinicians can predict which treatments will work best.

Today's Healthcare Women's Health - General
Published

Novel technique has potential to transform breast cancer detection      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

An innovative breast imaging technique provides high sensitivity for detecting cancer while significantly reducing the likelihood of false positive results. Researchers said the technique has the potential to offer more reliable breast cancer screening for a broader range of patients.

Children's Health Today's Healthcare
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This common medication could save half a million children's lives each year. So why is it underprescribed?      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Health care providers in developing countries know that oral rehydration salts (ORS) are a lifesaving and inexpensive treatment for diarrheal disease, a leading cause of death for children worldwide -- yet few prescribe it. A new study suggests that closing the knowledge gap between what treatments health care providers think patients want and what treatments patients really want could help save half a million lives a year and reduce unnecessary use of antibiotics.

Chronic Illness Today's Healthcare
Published

Analysis of biological networks helps explain the complexity of multiple sclerosis      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

An international study has used a computational biology tool that, by analyzing a multitude of biological data from multiple sclerosis patients ranging from genetic information to the whole organism, reveals the relationship between elements of different biological scales and improves our knowledge and the diagnosis of the disease.

Today's Healthcare
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Visualising multiple sclerosis with a new MRI procedure      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

ETH Zurich researchers have developed a new method of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the early detection and better monitoring of multiple sclerosis (MS). The method maps the myelin sheaths in the brain more precisely than was previously possible. The loss of myelin sheaths is a hallmark of MS. The new MRI method with its special head scanner could also be used by researchers to better visualise other solid tissue types such as connective tissue, tendons and ligaments.

Diabetes Today's Healthcare
Published

AI model as diabetes early warning system when driving      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Based solely on driving behavior and head/gaze motion, the newly developed tool recognizes low blood sugar levels.

Depression Mental Health Research Today's Healthcare
Published

Ketamine's promise for severe depression grows, but major questions remain      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Using an old anesthesia drug to pull people out of the depths of severe depression has gone from fringe idea to widespread use in just a few years. But major questions remain about who ketamine can help, why some people get relief while others don't, and the costs and benefits of different ways of delivering the drug. New findings just came out from a study that seeks to answer some of those questions.

Today's Healthcare
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New research uncovers biological drivers of heart disease risk      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Over the past 15 years, researchers have identified hundreds of regions in the human genome associated with heart attack risk. However, researchers lack efficient ways to explore how these genetic variants are molecularly connected to cardiovascular disease, limiting efforts to develop therapeutics. To streamline analysis of hundreds of genetic variants associated with coronary artery disease (CAD), a team of researchers combined multiple sequencing and experimental techniques to map the relationship between known CAD variants and the biological pathways they impact.

Healthy Aging Today's Healthcare
Published

Music may bring health benefits for older adults, poll suggests      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Three-quarters of people age 50 to 80 say music helps them relieve stress or relax and 65% say it helps their mental health or mood, according to a recent poll. Meanwhile, 60% say they get energized or motivated by music. Virtually all (98%) said they benefit in at least one health-related way from engaging with music.