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Categories: Diet and Weight Loss, Today's Healthcare

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Staying Healthy Today's Healthcare
Published

Drug limits dangerous reactions to allergy-triggering foods, Stanford Medicine-led study of kids finds      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A drug that binds to allergy-causing antibodies can protect children from dangerous reactions to accidentally eating allergy-triggering foods, a new study found.

Diet and Weight Loss Nutrition Obesity
Published

Metabolic diseases may be driven by gut microbiome, loss of ovarian hormones      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Mice that received fecal implants from donors that had their ovaries removed gained more fat mass and had greater expression of liver genes associated with inflammation, Type 2 diabetes, fatty liver disease and atherosclerosis. The findings may shed light on the greater incidence of metabolic dysfunction in postmenopausal women.

Crohn's Disease Today's Healthcare
Published

Treating newly-diagnosed Crohn's patients with advanced therapy leads to dramatic improvements in outcomes      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A large-scale clinical trial of treatment strategies for Crohn's disease has shown that offering early advanced therapy to all patients straight after diagnosis can drastically improve outcomes, including by reducing the number of people requiring urgent abdominal surgery for treatment of their disease by ten-fold.

Psychology Research Today's Healthcare
Published

How does the brain make decisions?      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Mouse study provides insights into communication between neurons during decision-making.

Children's Health Today's Healthcare
Published

Detecting pathogens faster and more accurately by melting DNA      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A new analysis method can detect pathogens in blood samples faster and more accurately than blood cultures, which are the current state of the art for infection diagnosis. The new method, called digital DNA melting analysis, can produce results in under six hours, whereas culture typically requires 15 hours to several days, depending on the pathogen.

Diet and Weight Loss Nutrition
Published

Common hair loss and prostate drug may also cut heart disease risk in men and mice      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

The drug finasteride, also known as Propecia or Proscar, treats male pattern baldness and enlarged prostate in millions of men worldwide. But a new study suggests the drug may also provide a surprising and life-saving benefit: lowering cholesterol and cutting the overall risk of cardiovascular disease.

Children's Health Diet and Weight Loss Eating Disorder Research Nutrition
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Avid appetite in childhood linked to later eating disorder symptoms      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

The study looked at survey data from 3,670 young people in the UK and the Netherlands to investigate how appetite traits in early childhood might relate to the likelihood of developing eating disorder symptoms up to 10 years later. The researchers found that a particularly high food responsiveness, defined as the urge to eat when you see, smell or taste palatable food, at the ages of four and five was linked to a higher likelihood of reporting a range of eating disorder symptoms at ages 12 to 14.

Diet and Weight Loss Dietary Supplements and Minerals Nutrition Obesity
Published

Bridging diet, microbes, and metabolism: Implications for metabolic disorders      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Mounting evidence suggests that the secret to understanding human health and combating metabolic diseases lies hidden within the microscopic world of our gut bacteria. Recent research reveals that a specific fatty acid produced by gut bacteria directly influences fat metabolism in animals. This research is pivotal as it sheds light on the complex interplay between the diet, gut microbiota, and host metabolic health, offering insights that could open new avenues in our approach to managing metabolic disorders.

Today's Healthcare
Published

Study identifies increase in antibiotic-resistant typhoid      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A study has shown that shortly after an increase in antimicrobial use -- specifically the antibiotic ciprofloxacin -- rates of antimicrobial-resistant Salmonella typhi increased.

Chronic Illness Diabetes Diet and Weight Loss Healthy Aging Nutrition Obesity Today's Healthcare
Published

Fasting-like diet lowers risk factors for disease, reduces biological age in humans      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Cycles of a diet that mimics fasting can reduce signs of immune system aging, as well as insulin resistance and liver fat in humans, resulting in a lower biological age, according to a new study.

Today's Healthcare
Published

New model identifies drugs that shouldn't be taken together      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers have developed a multipronged strategy to identify the transporters used by different drugs. Their approach, which makes use of both tissue models and machine-learning algorithms, has already revealed that a commonly prescribed antibiotic and a blood-thinner can interfere with each other.

Diet and Weight Loss Dieting and Weight Control Nutrition Today's Healthcare
Published

Could ultra-processed foods be the new 'silent' killer?      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Hundreds of novel ingredients never encountered by human physiology are now found in nearly 60 percent of the average adult's diet and nearly 70 percent of children's diets in the U.S. An emerging health hazard is the unprecedented consumption of these ultra-processed foods in the standard American diet. This may be the new 'silent' killer, as was unrecognized high blood pressure in previous decades. Physicians provide important insights in a battle where the entertainment industry, the food industry and public policy do not align with their patients' needs.

Today's Healthcare
Published

Scientists develop novel radiotracer for earlier detection of disease      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Scientists have developed a new radiotracer (called [18F]4-FDF) that can map how cells use fructose for energy.

Birth Defects Child Development Children's Health Depression Infant's Health Mental Health Research Parenting Pregnancy and Childbirth Psychology Research Today's Healthcare
Published

Stress during pregnancy can lead to early maturation of first-born daughters      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers have found a correlation between early signs of adrenal puberty in first-born daughters and their mothers' having experienced high levels of prenatal stress. They did not find the same result in boys or daughters who were not first-born.

Today's Healthcare
Published

A new glue, potentially also for you      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Hydrogels are already used in clinical practice for the delivery of drugs, and as lenses, bone cement, wound dressings, 3D scaffolds in tissue engineering and other applications. However, bonding different hydrogel polymers to one another has remained a challenge; yet it could enable numerous new applications. Now, researchers have pioneered a new method that uses a thin film of chitosan, a fibrous sugar-based material derived from the processed outer skeletons of shellfish, to make different hydrogels instantaneously and strongly stick to each other. They used their approach to locally protect and cool tissues, seal vascular injuries, and prevent unwanted 'surgical adhesions' of internal body surfaces.

Chronic Illness Today's Healthcare
Published

Flu vaccines were effective in 2022-2023 flu season, studies find      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

The prospect of the worrisome triple threat of COVID, RSV and flu was assuaged last year by the effectiveness of flu vaccines. Two recent studies from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's VISION Network have found that flu vaccines were effective for all ages against both moderate and severe flu in the U.S. during the 2022-2023 flu season.

Diet and Weight Loss Dietary Supplements and Minerals Nutrition
Published

Eating too much protein is bad for your arteries, and this amino acid is to blame      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Consuming over 22% of dietary calories from protein can lead to increased activation of immune cells that play a role in atherosclerotic plaque formation and drive the disease risk, new study showed.

Chronic Illness Diet and Weight Loss Dietary Supplements and Minerals Nutrition Vitamin
Published

Link between high levels of niacin -- a common B vitamin -- and heart disease, study suggests      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers have identified a new pathway that contributes to cardiovascular disease associated with high levels of niacin, a common B vitamin previously recommended to lower cholesterol. The team discovered a link between 4PY, a breakdown product from excess niacin, and heart disease. Higher circulating levels of 4PY were strongly associated with development of heart attack, stroke and other adverse cardiac events in large-scale clinical studies. The researchers also showed in preclinical studies that 4PY directly triggers vascular inflammation which damages blood vessels and can lead to atherosclerosis over time.

Chronic Illness Today's Healthcare
Published

Heart attack significantly increases risk of other health conditions      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Having a heart attack significantly increases the risk of developing other serious long-term health conditions, a major new study shows. Researchers analyzed more than 145 million records covering every adult patient admitted to hospital in England over a nine-year period to establish the risk of long-term health outcomes following a heart attack -- in the largest study of its kind. Up to a third of patients went on to develop heart or kidney failure, 7% had further heart attacks and 38% died from any cause within the nine-year study period. Heart failure, atrial fibrillation, stroke, peripheral arterial disease, severe bleeding, kidney failure, type 2 diabetes and depression all occurred more frequently for people who had a heart attack compared with those who did not.

Diet and Weight Loss Nutrition
Published

Do sugar-free candy and gum give you gas? Researchers think they know why      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Scientists may have figured out why some people have trouble digesting sorbitol, a sugar alcohol used in sugar-free gum, mints, candy and other products.