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Categories: Crohn's Disease, Today's Healthcare

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Staying Healthy Today's Healthcare
Published

Drug limits dangerous reactions to allergy-triggering foods, Stanford Medicine-led study of kids finds      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A drug that binds to allergy-causing antibodies can protect children from dangerous reactions to accidentally eating allergy-triggering foods, a new study found.

Crohn's Disease Today's Healthcare
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Treating newly-diagnosed Crohn's patients with advanced therapy leads to dramatic improvements in outcomes      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A large-scale clinical trial of treatment strategies for Crohn's disease has shown that offering early advanced therapy to all patients straight after diagnosis can drastically improve outcomes, including by reducing the number of people requiring urgent abdominal surgery for treatment of their disease by ten-fold.

Psychology Research Today's Healthcare
Published

How does the brain make decisions?      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Mouse study provides insights into communication between neurons during decision-making.

Today's Healthcare
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Detecting pathogens faster and more accurately by melting DNA      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A new analysis method can detect pathogens in blood samples faster and more accurately than blood cultures, which are the current state of the art for infection diagnosis. The new method, called digital DNA melting analysis, can produce results in under six hours, whereas culture typically requires 15 hours to several days, depending on the pathogen.

Today's Healthcare
Published

Study identifies increase in antibiotic-resistant typhoid      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A study has shown that shortly after an increase in antimicrobial use -- specifically the antibiotic ciprofloxacin -- rates of antimicrobial-resistant Salmonella typhi increased.

Chronic Illness Diabetes Diet and Weight Loss Healthy Aging Nutrition Obesity Today's Healthcare
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Fasting-like diet lowers risk factors for disease, reduces biological age in humans      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Cycles of a diet that mimics fasting can reduce signs of immune system aging, as well as insulin resistance and liver fat in humans, resulting in a lower biological age, according to a new study.

Today's Healthcare
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New model identifies drugs that shouldn't be taken together      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers have developed a multipronged strategy to identify the transporters used by different drugs. Their approach, which makes use of both tissue models and machine-learning algorithms, has already revealed that a commonly prescribed antibiotic and a blood-thinner can interfere with each other.

Diet and Weight Loss Dieting and Weight Control Nutrition Today's Healthcare
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Could ultra-processed foods be the new 'silent' killer?      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Hundreds of novel ingredients never encountered by human physiology are now found in nearly 60 percent of the average adult's diet and nearly 70 percent of children's diets in the U.S. An emerging health hazard is the unprecedented consumption of these ultra-processed foods in the standard American diet. This may be the new 'silent' killer, as was unrecognized high blood pressure in previous decades. Physicians provide important insights in a battle where the entertainment industry, the food industry and public policy do not align with their patients' needs.

Today's Healthcare
Published

Scientists develop novel radiotracer for earlier detection of disease      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Scientists have developed a new radiotracer (called [18F]4-FDF) that can map how cells use fructose for energy.

Birth Defects Child Development Children's Health Depression Infant's Health Mental Health Research Parenting Pregnancy and Childbirth Psychology Research Today's Healthcare
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Stress during pregnancy can lead to early maturation of first-born daughters      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers have found a correlation between early signs of adrenal puberty in first-born daughters and their mothers' having experienced high levels of prenatal stress. They did not find the same result in boys or daughters who were not first-born.

Today's Healthcare
Published

A new glue, potentially also for you      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Hydrogels are already used in clinical practice for the delivery of drugs, and as lenses, bone cement, wound dressings, 3D scaffolds in tissue engineering and other applications. However, bonding different hydrogel polymers to one another has remained a challenge; yet it could enable numerous new applications. Now, researchers have pioneered a new method that uses a thin film of chitosan, a fibrous sugar-based material derived from the processed outer skeletons of shellfish, to make different hydrogels instantaneously and strongly stick to each other. They used their approach to locally protect and cool tissues, seal vascular injuries, and prevent unwanted 'surgical adhesions' of internal body surfaces.

Chronic Illness Today's Healthcare
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Flu vaccines were effective in 2022-2023 flu season, studies find      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

The prospect of the worrisome triple threat of COVID, RSV and flu was assuaged last year by the effectiveness of flu vaccines. Two recent studies from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's VISION Network have found that flu vaccines were effective for all ages against both moderate and severe flu in the U.S. during the 2022-2023 flu season.

Chronic Illness Today's Healthcare
Published

Heart attack significantly increases risk of other health conditions      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Having a heart attack significantly increases the risk of developing other serious long-term health conditions, a major new study shows. Researchers analyzed more than 145 million records covering every adult patient admitted to hospital in England over a nine-year period to establish the risk of long-term health outcomes following a heart attack -- in the largest study of its kind. Up to a third of patients went on to develop heart or kidney failure, 7% had further heart attacks and 38% died from any cause within the nine-year study period. Heart failure, atrial fibrillation, stroke, peripheral arterial disease, severe bleeding, kidney failure, type 2 diabetes and depression all occurred more frequently for people who had a heart attack compared with those who did not.

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Chronic Illness Today's Healthcare
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Chronic fatigue syndrome: Number of patients is expected to double due to long-term effects of the COVID-19 pandemic      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

The number of ME/CFS patients is expected to rise drastically due to long-term effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. Scientists have now identified possible biomarkers that could improve the diagnosis and treatment of long-lasting and debilitating fatigue.

Healthy Aging Today's Healthcare
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New epigenetic clocks reinvent how we measure age      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Investigators unveil a new form of epigenetic clock -- a machine learning model designed to predict biological age from DNA structure.

Today's Healthcare
Published

A new test could predict how heart attack patients will respond to mechanical pumps      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers discovered why ventricular assist devices (VADs) used to support the left ventricle of cardiogenic shock patients can induce right ventricle dysfunction. They also developed a test that doctors could use to determine whether this dysfunction will occur.

Today's Healthcare
Published

Treating liver cancer with microrobots piloted by a magnetic field      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers have developed a novel approach to treat liver tumors using magnet-guided microrobots in an MRI device.

Skin Care Today's Healthcare
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Wound-homing molecule accelerates tissue repair      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Medical researchers have found a peptide which, when administered intravenously, homes in on the new blood vessels that are forming in damaged tissue. The peptide has been used as a delivery vehicle for therapeutics targeted at regenerating tissues. A new study has discovered that the peptide activates the natural healing mechanism in the tissue, accelerating regeneration. The finding opens new opportunities to treat not only skin wounds, but also any injuries resulting from accidents and traumas, such as ruptured muscles and fractured bones.

Today's Healthcare
Published

Case study: Drug-resistant bacteria responds to phage-antibiotic combo therapy      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

An experimental treatment using viruses to kill bacteria gave a mother more months of life and furthered knowledge to help future patients, researchers report in a recent case study.

Today's Healthcare
Published

New understanding of avian eggshell attachment -- implications for medical procedures and egg industry      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Athletes often suffer injuries to ligaments in their knees, particularly to the anterior cruciate ligament or ACL. While surgery to replace these torn ligaments is becoming increasingly common around the world it often needs to be repeated. That's because it has proved challenging to anchor fibrous, soft and wet ligament grafting material into hard bone. Now, researchers have new information from the eggshell membrane in chicken eggs that could help change this picture thanks to the potential it offers for improvements in tissue engineering and biomaterial grafts. Their findings also have the potential to reduce losses for commercial egg and poultry producers.