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Categories: Living Well, Skin Care

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Diabetes Skin Care Today's Healthcare
Published

Wound treatment gel fights the battle against antibacterial resistance      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Polymer-based hydrogels are used to treat skin ailments and in tissue engineering because of their ability to retain water, deliver drugs into wounds, and biodegrade. However, they are complicated to manufacture and not very resilient to external forces like rubbing against clothing, sheets, or wound dressings. Scientists have now created a hydrogel enhanced with the amino acid polylysine and blood plasma that is easier to synthesize, contains natural antibiotic properties, and promotes cell growth.

Child Development Living Well
Published

A decade of aphantasia research: what we've learned about people who can't visualize      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

People who can't visualize an image in their mind's eye are less likely to remember the details of important past personal events or to recognize faces, according to a review of nearly ten years of research. People who cannot bring to mind visual imagery are also less likely to experience imagery of other kinds, like imagining music, according to new research by the academic who first discovered the phenomenon.

Diabetes Neuropathy Skin Care Today's Healthcare
Published

Discovery has potential to solve the billion-dollar global cost of poorly managed wound healing      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Scientists have uncovered a key step in the wound healing process that becomes disabled in diseases like diabetes and aging, contributing to a global healthcare cost of managing poorly healing wounds exceeding $250 billion a year. Importantly, the research reveals a molecule involved in the healing of tissues that -- when injected into animal models -- leads to a drastic acceleration of wound closure, up to 2.5 times faster, and 1.6 times more muscle regeneration.

Chronic Illness Skin Care Today's Healthcare
Published

Gene discovery offers new hope for people living with chronic skin disease      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Scientists have discovered a gene mutation is responsible for causing psoriasis -- a chronic inflammatory skin disease that causes patients to develop red, scaly and itchy patches across their body. According to researchers, if two copies of this mutated gene (known as IKBKB) are present, patients with psoriasis may go on to develop psoriatic arthritis, leaving them with joint pain, stiffness and swelling. It's hoped the findings will lead to improved diagnosis and treatment for patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis -- conditions that patients say carry stigma in the community.

Skin Care Today's Healthcare
Published

AI-based app can help physicians find skin melanoma      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A mobile app that uses artificial intelligence, AI, to analyze images of suspected skin lesions can diagnose melanoma with very high precision, according to a new study.

Living Well
Published

It's hearty, it's meaty, it's mold      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Scientists are exploring how tuning the genomes of mushrooms and molds can transform these food sources into gourmet, nutrient-packed meals made with minimal processing and a light environmental footprint.

Living Well
Published

What kinds of seismic signals did Swifties send at LA concert?      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Seattle may have experienced its own Swift Quake last July, but at an August 2023 concert Taylor Swift's fans in Los Angeles gave scientists a lot of shaking to ponder. After some debate, a research team concluded that it was likely the dancing and jumping motions of the audience at SoFi Stadium -- not the musical beats or reverberations of the sound system -- that generated the concert's distinct harmonic tremors.

Living Well
Published

The surprising effect of presence hallucinations on social perception      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Neuroscientists have devised a way to alter our social perception and monitor specific types of hallucinations, both in healthy individuals and patients with Parkinson's disease. The test, which is also available online, provides the medical community with a tool to monitor hallucination susceptibility.

Skin Care Today's Healthcare
Published

Wearable tech captures real-time hemodynamics on the go      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers have developed a photoacoustic imaging watch for high-resolution imaging of blood vessels in the skin. The wearable device could offer a non-invasive way to monitor hemodynamic indicators such as heart rate, blood pressure and oxygen saturation that can indicate how well a person's heart is working.

Living Well
Published

AI-generated food images look tastier than real ones      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers have announced an intriguing discovery -- consumers generally prefer AI-generated images of food over real food images, especially when they are unaware of their true nature.

Fertility Pregnancy and Childbirth Skin Care
Published

Research sheds light on new strategy to treat infertility      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

New research describes the science behind a promising technique to treat infertility by turning a skin cell into an egg that is capable of producing viable embryos. The technique could be used by women of advanced maternal age or for those who are unable to produce viable eggs due to previous treatment for cancer or other causes. It also raises the possibility of men in same-sex relationships having children who are genetically related to both parents.

Dietary Supplements and Minerals Skin Care Vitamin
Published

Vitamin A may play a central role in stem cell biology and wound repair      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Retinoic acid, the active state of Vitamin A, appears to regulate how stem cells enter and exit a transient state central to their role in wound repair.

Child Development Living Well
Published

Sprinting 'like a jet' will produce Premier League strikers of tomorrow, study shows      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Sprinting 'like a jet plane taking off' will help produce Premier League star strikers of tomorrow, new research has revealed. A new study of Tottenham Hotspur's academy has shown that just a few words can instantly boost sprinting speed by 3 per cent over 20 meters. It would normally take weeks of targeted training to achieve such a large increase.

Cosmetic Surgery Skin Care
Published

3D-printed skin closes wounds and contains hair follicle precursors      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Fat tissue holds the key to 3D printing layered living skin and potentially hair follicles, according to researchers who recently harnessed fat cells and supporting structures from clinically procured human tissue to precisely correct injuries in rats. The advancement could have implications for reconstructive facial surgery and even hair growth treatments for humans.

Living Well
Published

Beyond the ink: Painting with physics      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Falling from the tip of a brush suspended in mid-air, an ink droplet touches a painted surface and blossoms into a masterpiece of ever-changing beauty. It weaves a tapestry of intricate, evolving patterns. Some of them resemble branching snowflakes, thunderbolts or neurons, whispering the unique expression of the artist's vision.

Child Development Living Well
Published

AI outperforms humans in standardized tests of creative potential      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

In a recent study, 151 human participants were pitted against ChatGPT-4 in three tests designed to measure divergent thinking, which is considered to be an indicator of creative thought.

Skin Care
Published

Effect of keratin microsphere gel on hair growth in mice      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Keratin microsphere gel, consisting of keratin-based microspheres that swell in water to form a gel, has shown efficacy in promoting hair follicle growth in murine models. Its potential application as an active ingredient in hair regrowth treatments with minimal side effects is anticipated.

Living Well
Published

Researchers overestimate their own honesty      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

The average researcher thinks they are better than their colleagues at following good research practice. They also think that their own research field is better than other research fields at following good research practice. The results point to a risk of becoming blind to one's own shortcomings.

Skin Care Today's Healthcare
Published

Lab-spun sponges form perfect scaffolds for growing skin cells to heal wounds      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A new technique for electro-spinning sponges has allowed scientists to directly produce 3D scaffolds -- on which skin grafts could be grown from the patient's own skin.

Cosmetic Surgery Cosmetics Healthy Aging Skin Care
Published

Turning back the clock on photoaging skin      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A new study examines dermal injections and their impact on skin aging.