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Categories: Neuropathy, Skin Care

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Skin Care
Published

Toxic chemicals from microplastics can be absorbed through skin      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Toxic chemicals used to flame-proof plastic materials can be absorbed into the body through skin, via contact with microplastics, new research shows.

Diabetes Skin Care Today's Healthcare
Published

Wound treatment gel fights the battle against antibacterial resistance      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Polymer-based hydrogels are used to treat skin ailments and in tissue engineering because of their ability to retain water, deliver drugs into wounds, and biodegrade. However, they are complicated to manufacture and not very resilient to external forces like rubbing against clothing, sheets, or wound dressings. Scientists have now created a hydrogel enhanced with the amino acid polylysine and blood plasma that is easier to synthesize, contains natural antibiotic properties, and promotes cell growth.

Chronic Illness Fitness Neuropathy Today's Healthcare
Published

Did you know that physical activity can protect you from chronic pain?      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Reserachers found that people who were more active in their free time had a lower chance of having various types of chronic pain 7-8 years later. For example, being just a little more active, such as going from light to moderate activity, was associated with a 5% lower risk of reporting some form of chronic pain later. For severe chronic pain in several places in the body, higher activity was associated with a 16% reduced risk. The researchers found that the ability to tolerate pain played a role in this apparent protective effect. That explains why being active could lower the risk of having severe chronic pain, whether or not it was widespread throughout the body.

Diabetes Neuropathy Skin Care Today's Healthcare
Published

Discovery has potential to solve the billion-dollar global cost of poorly managed wound healing      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Scientists have uncovered a key step in the wound healing process that becomes disabled in diseases like diabetes and aging, contributing to a global healthcare cost of managing poorly healing wounds exceeding $250 billion a year. Importantly, the research reveals a molecule involved in the healing of tissues that -- when injected into animal models -- leads to a drastic acceleration of wound closure, up to 2.5 times faster, and 1.6 times more muscle regeneration.

Chronic Illness Skin Care Today's Healthcare
Published

Gene discovery offers new hope for people living with chronic skin disease      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Scientists have discovered a gene mutation is responsible for causing psoriasis -- a chronic inflammatory skin disease that causes patients to develop red, scaly and itchy patches across their body. According to researchers, if two copies of this mutated gene (known as IKBKB) are present, patients with psoriasis may go on to develop psoriatic arthritis, leaving them with joint pain, stiffness and swelling. It's hoped the findings will lead to improved diagnosis and treatment for patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis -- conditions that patients say carry stigma in the community.

Skin Care Today's Healthcare
Published

AI-based app can help physicians find skin melanoma      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A mobile app that uses artificial intelligence, AI, to analyze images of suspected skin lesions can diagnose melanoma with very high precision, according to a new study.

Skin Care Today's Healthcare
Published

Wearable tech captures real-time hemodynamics on the go      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers have developed a photoacoustic imaging watch for high-resolution imaging of blood vessels in the skin. The wearable device could offer a non-invasive way to monitor hemodynamic indicators such as heart rate, blood pressure and oxygen saturation that can indicate how well a person's heart is working.

Fertility Pregnancy and Childbirth Skin Care
Published

Research sheds light on new strategy to treat infertility      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

New research describes the science behind a promising technique to treat infertility by turning a skin cell into an egg that is capable of producing viable embryos. The technique could be used by women of advanced maternal age or for those who are unable to produce viable eggs due to previous treatment for cancer or other causes. It also raises the possibility of men in same-sex relationships having children who are genetically related to both parents.

Dietary Supplements and Minerals Skin Care Vitamin
Published

Vitamin A may play a central role in stem cell biology and wound repair      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Retinoic acid, the active state of Vitamin A, appears to regulate how stem cells enter and exit a transient state central to their role in wound repair.

Cosmetic Surgery Skin Care
Published

3D-printed skin closes wounds and contains hair follicle precursors      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Fat tissue holds the key to 3D printing layered living skin and potentially hair follicles, according to researchers who recently harnessed fat cells and supporting structures from clinically procured human tissue to precisely correct injuries in rats. The advancement could have implications for reconstructive facial surgery and even hair growth treatments for humans.

Healthy Aging Neuropathy
Published

An overgrowth of nerve cells appears to cause lingering symptoms after recurrent UTIs      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A perplexing problem for people with recurring urinary tract infections (UTIs) is persistent pain, even after antibiotics have successfully cleared the bacteria. Now researchers have identified the likely cause -- an overgrowth of nerve cells in the bladder.

Skin Care
Published

Effect of keratin microsphere gel on hair growth in mice      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Keratin microsphere gel, consisting of keratin-based microspheres that swell in water to form a gel, has shown efficacy in promoting hair follicle growth in murine models. Its potential application as an active ingredient in hair regrowth treatments with minimal side effects is anticipated.

Skin Care Today's Healthcare
Published

Lab-spun sponges form perfect scaffolds for growing skin cells to heal wounds      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A new technique for electro-spinning sponges has allowed scientists to directly produce 3D scaffolds -- on which skin grafts could be grown from the patient's own skin.

Cosmetic Surgery Cosmetics Healthy Aging Skin Care
Published

Turning back the clock on photoaging skin      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A new study examines dermal injections and their impact on skin aging.

Skin Care Today's Healthcare
Published

Wound-homing molecule accelerates tissue repair      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Medical researchers have found a peptide which, when administered intravenously, homes in on the new blood vessels that are forming in damaged tissue. The peptide has been used as a delivery vehicle for therapeutics targeted at regenerating tissues. A new study has discovered that the peptide activates the natural healing mechanism in the tissue, accelerating regeneration. The finding opens new opportunities to treat not only skin wounds, but also any injuries resulting from accidents and traumas, such as ruptured muscles and fractured bones.

Healthy Aging Skin Care
Published

Non-invasive techniques to detect skin cancer      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A study has demonstrated that the appearance of ageing skin looks noticeably different compared to younger skin, when examined under polarized laser light. The scientists believe that their new finding could pave the way for new, non-invasive light-based techniques to detect diseases, including cancer, in older individuals. This could significantly enhance early-stage treatment options for various skin conditions.

Skin Care Today's Healthcare
Published

Doctors have more difficulty diagnosing disease when looking at images of darker skin      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Doctors do not perform as well diagnosing skin diseases when the patient has darker skin, according to a new study. The researchers found assistance from artificial intelligence could improve doctors' accuracy, but those improvements were greater in patients with lighter skin.

Skin Care Today's Healthcare
Published

Small RNAs take on the big task of helping skin wounds heal better and faster with minimal scarring      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

New findings report that a class of small RNAs (microRNAs), microRNA-29, can restore normal skin structure rather than producing a wound closure by a connective tissue (scar). Any improvement of normal skin repair would benefit many patients affected by large-area or deep wounds prone to dysfunctional scarring.

Chronic Illness Diabetes Neuropathy
Published

Researchers uncover potential non-opioid treatment for chronic pain      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A new approach to treating neuropathic pain is making a key step forward. Neuropathic pain is among the most difficult types of pain to alleviate and current treatments are often ineffective. Researchers have identified a potential non-opioid treatment.

Healthy Aging Neuropathy Psychology Research Schizophrenia
Published

Firing nerve fibers in the brain are supplied with energy on demand      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

To rapidly transmit electrical signals in the brain, the long nerve fibers are insulated by specialized cells called oligodendrocytes. These cells also respond to the electrical signals of active nerve fibers and provide them with energy on demand, as researchers have discovered. If this process, regulated by potassium, is disabled in mice, the nerve fibers are severely damaged as the animals age -- resembling the defects of neurodegenerative diseases.