Showing 20 articles starting at article 1

Next 20 articles >

Categories: Pregnancy and Childbirth, Relationships

Return to the site home page

Relationships
Published

When saying 'please' is more strategic than magic      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

By kindergarten age, most children have been taught that 'please' is a magic word. 'Please' is an expression of politeness that shows courtesy and respect, turning a potential demand into a request that will -- poof! -- magically be granted. But a new study on the ways people make requests of one another suggests that 'please' might not be an all-purpose marker of politeness, but rather a more focused, strategic tool to manage frictions or obstacles among family members, friends and even coworkers. The study shows that people say 'please' much less often than expected, and mostly when they expect a 'no' response is forthcoming.

Children's Health Infant's Health Pregnancy and Childbirth
Published

Birth by C-section more than doubles odds of measles vaccine failure      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Birth by C-section more than doubles odds of measles vaccine failure. Researchers say it is vital that children born by caesarean section receive two doses of the measles vaccine for robust protection against the disease.

Relationships
Published

AI intervention mitigates tension among conflicting ethnic groups      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

While intergroup interaction is a prerequisite for initiating peace and stability, there is the risk of further escalation from direct interactions. A shortage of an impartial electronic contact session may cause the process to become destabilized. Interactive AI programs may help reduce prejudice and anxiety among historically divided ethnic groups in Afghanistan during online interactions.

Breastfeeding Infant's Health Pregnancy and Childbirth
Published

A new mother's immune status varies with her feeding strategy      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

In one of the first studies of its kind, UC Santa Barbara researchers have found that the immune status of postpartum mothers shifts with how she feeds her baby. Certain inflammatory proteins -- substances that are secreted as part of an immune response -- peak at different times of day, correlating with whether the mothers breastfeed, pump or formula-feed their babies.

Chronic Illness Diabetes Infant's Health Pregnancy and Childbirth
Published

Personalized screening early in pregnancy may improve preeclampsia detection      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Study suggests more extensive screening method in the first trimester of pregnancy may improve detection of preeclampsia.

Relationships
Published

Physics confirms that the enemy of your enemy is, indeed, your friend      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

The famous axiom 'the enemy of my enemy is my friend' is part of Austrian psychologist Fritz Heider's social balance theory, introduced in the 1940s. Previous studies have tried to model social networks based in famous theory but results remained controversial. New model takes into account two key pieces simultaneously: Not everyone knows everyone else in a social network, and some people are friendlier than others. With those two constraints, large-scale social networks consistently align with social balance theory. Model has broad applications for exploring political polarization, neural networks, drug interactions and more.

Pregnancy and Childbirth
Published

Source of pregnancy complications from infections revealed by placenta map      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

The placenta's response to infections from malaria, toxoplasmosis and listeria has been mapped in high resolution, possibly paving the way for new treatment options.

Relationships
Published

Social-media break has huge impact on young women's body image, study finds      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

There's a large and growing body of evidence pointing to potentially negative impacts of social media on mental health, from its addictive nature to disruptions in sleep patterns to effects on body image. Now, a new study has found that young women who took a social media break for as little as one week had a significant boost in self-esteem and body image -- particularly those most vulnerable to thin-ideal internalization.

Pregnancy and Childbirth
Published

Cell contractions drive the initial shaping of human embryos      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Human embryo compaction, an essential step in the first days of an embryo's development, is driven by the contractility of its cells. These results contradict the presupposed driving role of cell adhesion in this phenomenon and pave the way for improved assisted reproductive technology (ART).

Pregnancy and Childbirth
Published

Father's gut microbes affect the next generation      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers changed the composition of the gut microbiota in male mice through common antibiotics, inducing a condition called dysbiosis, and found that: - Mouse pups sired by a dysbiotic father show significantly lower birth weight, and have increased risk of growth disorders and postnatal mortality.

Fertility Pregnancy and Childbirth
Published

Discovery of an atypical heat shock factor, HSF5, involved in meiotic mechanisms: Implications for male infertility      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers have identified a novel Heat Shock Factor (HSF), designated as HSF5, which plays a crucial role in the completion of meiosis and the activation of genes essential for sperm formation. This discovery provides valuable insights into underlying causes of spermatogenic failure, the major contributor to male infertility. Furthermore, unlike other typical Heat Shock Factors, which primarily regulate gene expression in response to stress, such as heat shock, HSF5 plays a specific role in male germ production during meiosis under non-stress conditions.

Relationships
Published

Loneliness grows as we age      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Loneliness in adulthood follows a U-shaped pattern: it's higher in younger and older adulthood, and lowest during middle adulthood, reports a new study that examined nine longitudinal studies from around the world. The study also identified several risk factors for heightened loneliness across the whole lifespan, including social isolation, education and physical impairment.

Birth Defects Child Development Pregnancy and Childbirth Psychology Research
Published

Pregnancy cytokine levels impact fetal brain development and offspring behavior      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers have discovered in a preclinical model that cytokines, proteins that control immune response, circulating in maternal blood during pregnancy may mitigate an offspring's risk for psychiatric conditions. The findings are surprising because circulating maternal cytokines are at such low levels that they were not implicated in fetal brain development and offspring behavior before.

Relationships
Published

Don't be a stranger -- study finds rekindling old friendships as scary as making new ones      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Psychologists have found that people are as hesitant to reach out to an old friend as they are to strike up a conversation with a stranger, even when they had the capacity and desire to do so.

Children's Health Infant's Health Pregnancy and Childbirth
Published

Dengue fever infections have negative impacts on infant health for three years      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Dengue infections in pregnant women may have a negative impact on the first years of children's lives, new research has found.

Relationships
Published

Exploring brain synchronization patterns during social interactions      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Social interactions synchronize brain activity within individuals and between individuals. In a new study, researchers compared brain synchronization between pairs of people with relatively strong social ties (acquaintance pairs) and pairs with almost no social ties (stranger pairs). The study found that during a cooperative task, the stranger pairs exhibited more closely connected brain networks compared to the acquaintance pairs. These findings challenge the conventional understanding that stronger social bonds lead to greater brain synchronization.

Pregnancy and Childbirth
Published

Pressure in the womb may influence facial development      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Physical cues in the womb, and not just genetics, influence the normal development of neural crest cells, the embryonic stem cells that form facial features, finds a new study.

Healthy Aging Pregnancy and Childbirth Today's Healthcare
Published

Researchers find that accelerated aging biology in the placenta contributes to a rare form of pregnancy-related heart failure      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

In a new study, researchers show that elevated levels of proteins related to cellular senescence, or aging, in the blood and the placenta are linked to this form of heart failure.

Diabetes Pregnancy and Childbirth
Published

New study focuses on the placenta for clues to the development of gestational diabetes      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A new study has identified that a deficit in the placental expression of the gene insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGFBP1) and low IGFBP1 circulating levels are associated with insulin resistance during pregnancy, highlighting a potential risk factor for the development of gestational diabetes.

Child Development Children's Health Diet and Weight Loss Dieting and Weight Control Obesity Relationships
Published

Family and media pressure to lose weight in adolescence linked to how people value themselves almost two decades later      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

People who as teenagers felt pressure to lose weight from family or from the media, females, people who are not heterosexual, and people experiencing socioeconomic disadvantage, are most at risk of 'internalized' weight stigma, new research has found.