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Categories: Crohn's Disease, Relationships

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Relationships
Published

Shining a light on the effects of habituation and neural adaptation on the evolution of animal signals      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A new paper examines the possible effects of two properties of receiver playing fields documented in studies of animal psychology -- habituation and neural adaptation -- on the efficacy of mate choice signals.

Crohn's Disease Today's Healthcare
Published

Treating newly-diagnosed Crohn's patients with advanced therapy leads to dramatic improvements in outcomes      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A large-scale clinical trial of treatment strategies for Crohn's disease has shown that offering early advanced therapy to all patients straight after diagnosis can drastically improve outcomes, including by reducing the number of people requiring urgent abdominal surgery for treatment of their disease by ten-fold.

Relationships
Published

Reported marital harmony -- or conflict -- accounts for nearly ten percent of the variation in mental health self-assessments in a broad study of Australian adults      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Australian adults who report a good relationship that meets their original expectations tend to score higher in mental health, while adults who report loving their spouse but wished they had never entered the relationship and note relationship problems tend to score significantly lower in mental health, according to a survey of almost 7000 Australian adults.

Relationships
Published

Low voice pitch increases standing among strangers      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

If you're looking for a long-term relationship or to boost your social status, lower your pitch, according to researchers studying the effects of voice pitch on social perceptions. They found that lower voice pitch makes women and men sound more attractive to potential long-term partners, and lower voice pitch in males makes the individual sound more formidable and prestigious among other men.

Relationships
Published

How a city is organized can create less-biased citizens      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A new study presents data and a mathematical model to explain why there is more unconscious, or implicit, racial bias in some cities than others. The study, which brings together the math of cities with the psychology of how individuals develop unconscious racial biases, suggests that a city's level of implicit bias depends on how populous, diverse, and segregated that city is.

Relationships
Published

Looking for love? Try finding purpose as well      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

The world of online dating can be overwhelming with the dizzying array of options for attracting a partner but new research shows that those looking for love may have more success if they also seek a sense of purpose in life.

Chronic Illness Crohn's Disease Mental Health Research Today's Healthcare
Published

Mood interventions may reduce inflammation in Crohn's and Colitis      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

New research reveals that interventions which improve mood can reduce levels of inflammation in people with inflammatory bowel disease by 18 per cent, compared to having no mood intervention.

Relationships
Published

Couples: Caring for oneself can lead to happier relationships -- on both sides      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Being more forgiving of your own shortcomings in a romantic relationship can lead to happier couples. A total of 209 heterosexual couples were surveyed. The results show that men in particular benefit if their partner is self-compassionate. The results provide important information for couples' therapies, as self-compassion can be trained.

Relationships
Published

How does materialism in social media trigger stress and unhappiness?      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Clothes, cars, travel, followers: People with a materialistic mindset always want more and, above all, more than others. Social media provides them with ideal opportunities to compare themselves with others, which makes them susceptible to passive and addictive user behavior. This stresses them out and, ultimately, leads to low life satisfaction. This downward spiral, which turns materialists into less happy people, was identified in an online survey of over 1,200 participants.

Relationships
Published

Online versus reality: Social media influences perceptions      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

People may form inaccurate impressions about us from our social media posts, finds new research that is the first to examine perceptions of our personalities based on online posts.

Relationships
Published

Science confirms it: Love leaves a mark on the brain      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

The brain produces more of the pleasure-inducing hormone dopamine when we're longing for or hanging out with our partner, new research suggests. But when we break up, their unique 'chemical imprint' fades away. The study centers around prairie voles, which have the distinction of being among the 3 percent to 5 percent of mammals that form monogamous pair bonds.

Psychology Research Relationships
Published

Understanding the neuroendocrine basis for social anxiety-like behavior in male mice      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers have discovered that estrogen receptor (ER), expressed in the lateral septum of the limbic system, plays a crucial role in suppressing anxiety-like behavior exhibited by male mice in social situations. They also discovered that the distribution and expression region of ER differs from that of ER.

Relationships
Published

Love scrambles the brain and scientists can now tell us why      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Love is blind, the saying goes, and thanks to a new study we are now a step closer to understanding why. Researchers have measured how a part of the brain is responsible for putting our loved one on a pedestal in that first flush of romance.

Relationships
Published

Social media posts may be viewed differently by others to how users perceive themselves      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

In a new study, viewers of Facebook users' posts came away with perceptions of the users that differed from the users' own self-perceptions.

Child Development Infant and Preschool Learning Parenting Relationships
Published

Mothers and children have their birthday in the same month more often than you'd think -- and here's why      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Do you celebrate your birthday in the same month as your mum?  If so, you are not alone. The phenomenon occurs more commonly than expected -- a new study of millions of families has revealed. 

Chronic Illness Crohn's Disease
Published

Researchers reveal prevalence of persistent symptoms in patients with microscopic colitis      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A new study examines how multiple factors contribute to the miscommunication and understanding of the digestive disease, microscopic colitis.

Relationships
Published

Is age linked to the picture of the perfect partner?      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

How do women picture the partner of their dreams? And how does this vary between women based on their age? A team of researchers has investigated the complex relationships between age and preferences for a partner in a large, international sample of single women. The study found that most preferences for a partner showed no variation between women of different ages. However, higher age was linked to a preference for confident and assertive partners, as well as acceptance of a larger age range, in particular a higher acceptance of a partner being younger than oneself. Age was also linked to the parenting intentions of the ideal partner: consistently high in importance until approximately age 28 and then decreasing thereafter.

Child Development Children's Health Relationships
Published

Health impacts of abuse more extensive than previously thought, research says      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Partners and children who are subject to domestic abuse are more likely to experience certain physical and mental health effects than previously thought, according to a new meta-analysis.

Relationships
Published

Social chatbots and their impact on neurodiverse people      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

New research shows that social chatbots could be doing more harm than good for neurodiverse people, entrenching social isolation and reinforcing dysfunctional habits among many people with autism, anxiety and limited social skills.

Relationships
Published

Just say no to that invitation      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

It may feel unforgivably rude to reject an invitation -- even one to an event you would much prefer not to attend -- but people often overestimate the social consequences of saying no, according to new research.