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Categories: Crohn's Disease, Living Well

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Crohn's Disease Today's Healthcare
Published

New Inflammatory Bowel Disease testing protocol could speed up diagnosis      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Patients with suspected inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) could benefit from better testing protocols that would reduce the need and lengthy wait for potentially unnecessary colonoscopies, a new study has found.

Chronic Illness Crohn's Disease Today's Healthcare
Published

Hope for treating autoimmune diseases      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A routine blood test that measures a patient's inflammation levels could improve the early diagnosis and management of a wide range of debilitating autoimmune diseases. The Systemic Inflammation Index (SII) uses information from routine laboratory data to measure inflammation in the body and examining this index in a new way could provide vital answers.

Crohn's Disease Today's Healthcare
Published

Gene analysis generates spatial map of intestinal cells and traces their trajectories during gut inflammation      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Cells within the intestines perform various roles including nutrient absorption, sensing, and maintaining homeostasis. Certain chronic disorders are distinctly characterized by gut inflammation, which disrupts intestinal cells and can lead to a remodeling of the gut and the introduction of new immune cells. To better understand the types of cells and their positioning within the intestines, researchers used a new technique known as MERFISH (multiplexed-error robust-fluorescence in situ hybridization) to analyze 940 genes in 1.35 million intestinal cells in a mouse model of colitis.

Child Development Living Well
Published

A decade of aphantasia research: what we've learned about people who can't visualize      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

People who can't visualize an image in their mind's eye are less likely to remember the details of important past personal events or to recognize faces, according to a review of nearly ten years of research. People who cannot bring to mind visual imagery are also less likely to experience imagery of other kinds, like imagining music, according to new research by the academic who first discovered the phenomenon.

Chronic Illness Crohn's Disease
Published

Implantable sensor could lead to timelier Crohn's treatment      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Scientists have developed the first wireless, implantable temperature sensor to detect inflammatory flareups in patients with Crohn's disease. The approach offers long-term, real-time monitoring and could enable clinicians to act earlier to prevent or limit the permanent damage caused by inflammatory episodes.

Living Well
Published

It's hearty, it's meaty, it's mold      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Scientists are exploring how tuning the genomes of mushrooms and molds can transform these food sources into gourmet, nutrient-packed meals made with minimal processing and a light environmental footprint.

Living Well
Published

What kinds of seismic signals did Swifties send at LA concert?      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Seattle may have experienced its own Swift Quake last July, but at an August 2023 concert Taylor Swift's fans in Los Angeles gave scientists a lot of shaking to ponder. After some debate, a research team concluded that it was likely the dancing and jumping motions of the audience at SoFi Stadium -- not the musical beats or reverberations of the sound system -- that generated the concert's distinct harmonic tremors.

Crohn's Disease
Published

New understanding of the gut immune system may hold promise for Crohn's disease patients      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Scientists uncovered an overlooked mechanism in the gut immune system of patients suffering from severe cases of Crohn's disease. The discovery may help define how to treat patients with severe Crohn's disease.

Living Well
Published

The surprising effect of presence hallucinations on social perception      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Neuroscientists have devised a way to alter our social perception and monitor specific types of hallucinations, both in healthy individuals and patients with Parkinson's disease. The test, which is also available online, provides the medical community with a tool to monitor hallucination susceptibility.

Living Well
Published

AI-generated food images look tastier than real ones      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers have announced an intriguing discovery -- consumers generally prefer AI-generated images of food over real food images, especially when they are unaware of their true nature.

Child Development Living Well
Published

Sprinting 'like a jet' will produce Premier League strikers of tomorrow, study shows      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Sprinting 'like a jet plane taking off' will help produce Premier League star strikers of tomorrow, new research has revealed. A new study of Tottenham Hotspur's academy has shown that just a few words can instantly boost sprinting speed by 3 per cent over 20 meters. It would normally take weeks of targeted training to achieve such a large increase.

Living Well
Published

Beyond the ink: Painting with physics      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Falling from the tip of a brush suspended in mid-air, an ink droplet touches a painted surface and blossoms into a masterpiece of ever-changing beauty. It weaves a tapestry of intricate, evolving patterns. Some of them resemble branching snowflakes, thunderbolts or neurons, whispering the unique expression of the artist's vision.

Child Development Living Well
Published

AI outperforms humans in standardized tests of creative potential      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

In a recent study, 151 human participants were pitted against ChatGPT-4 in three tests designed to measure divergent thinking, which is considered to be an indicator of creative thought.

Living Well
Published

Researchers overestimate their own honesty      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

The average researcher thinks they are better than their colleagues at following good research practice. They also think that their own research field is better than other research fields at following good research practice. The results point to a risk of becoming blind to one's own shortcomings.

Crohn's Disease Today's Healthcare
Published

Treating newly-diagnosed Crohn's patients with advanced therapy leads to dramatic improvements in outcomes      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A large-scale clinical trial of treatment strategies for Crohn's disease has shown that offering early advanced therapy to all patients straight after diagnosis can drastically improve outcomes, including by reducing the number of people requiring urgent abdominal surgery for treatment of their disease by ten-fold.

Child Development Living Well
Published

Great apes playfully tease each other      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Babies playfully tease others as young as eight months of age. Since language is not required for this behavior, similar kinds of playful teasing might be present in non-human animals. Now cognitive biologists and primatologists have documented playful teasing in four species of great apes. Like joking behavior in humans, ape teasing is provocative, persistent, and includes elements of surprise and play. Because all four great ape species used playful teasing, it is likely that the prerequisites for humor evolved in the human lineage at least 13 million years ago.

Living Well
Published

Smart earrings can monitor a person's temperature      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers introduced the Thermal Earring, a wireless wearable that continuously monitors a user's earlobe temperature. Potential applications include tracking signs of ovulation, stress, eating and exercise. The smart earring prototype is about the size and weight of a small paperclip and has a 28-day battery life.

Living Well
Published

How teachers make ethical judgments when using AI in the classroom      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A teacher's gender and comfort with technology factor into whether artificial intelligence is adopted in the classroom, as shown in a new report.

Chronic Illness Crohn's Disease Mental Health Research Today's Healthcare
Published

Mood interventions may reduce inflammation in Crohn's and Colitis      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

New research reveals that interventions which improve mood can reduce levels of inflammation in people with inflammatory bowel disease by 18 per cent, compared to having no mood intervention.

Living Well
Published

Knowing what dogs like to watch could help veterinarians assess their vision      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A veterinary ophthalmologist wanted to determine factors, including age and vision, that influence a dog's interest in interacting with video content. Ultimately, the goal of the study, which launched two years ago, was to support development of more sensitive ways to assess canine vision -- something that has been sorely lacking in veterinary medicine. The study found that dogs are most engaged when watching videos that feature other animals.