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Categories: Crohn's Disease, Women's Health - General

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Healthy Aging Women's Health - General
Published

Could getting enough sleep help prevent osteoporosis?      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

In people's early- to mid-20s, they reach what is called peak bone mineral density, which is higher for men than it is for women, according to researchers. This peak is one of the main determinants of fracture risk later in life. After reaching this peak, a person's bone density remains roughly stable for a couple of decades. Then, when women enter the menopausal transition, they experience accelerated bone loss. Men also experience bone density decline as they age. Sleep patterns also evolve over time.

Depression Menopause Mental Health Research Women's Health - General
Published

Women are 40% more likely to experience depression during the perimenopause      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Women are 40% more likely to experience depression in the perimenopause than those who aren't experiencing any menopausal symptoms, finds a new study.

Women's Health - General
Published

Breast cancer rates rising among Canadian women in their 20s, 30s and 40s      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Rates of breast cancer in women under the age of 50 are rising in Canada according to a study which showed an increase in breast cancer diagnoses among females in their twenties, thirties, and forties.

Birth Defects Women's Health - General
Published

Gene-based therapy restores cellular development and function in brain cells from people with Timothy syndrome      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

In a proof-of-concept study, researchers demonstrated the effectiveness of a potential new therapy for Timothy syndrome, an often life-threatening and rare genetic disorder that affects a wide range of bodily systems, leading to severe cardiac, neurological, and psychiatric symptoms as well as physical differences such as webbed fingers and toes.

Crohn's Disease
Published

Apply single-cell analysis to reveal mechanisms of a common complication of Crohn's disease      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Study identifies key pathways underlying perianal fistula, a disease complication that is more prevalent and severe in African American populations.

Crohn's Disease
Published

Scientists discover the cellular functions of a family of proteins integral to inflammatory diseases      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

In a scientific breakthrough, researchers have revealed the biological mechanisms by which a family of proteins known as histone deacetylases (HDACs) activate immune system cells linked to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and other inflammatory diseases.

Psychology Research Women's Health - General
Published

Glial hyper-drive for triggering epileptic seizures      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

When epileptic patients suffer seizures, their brain is undergoing repetitive and excessive neuronal firing. But what triggers this has stumped scientists for years. Now, researchers have used fluorescence calcium sensors to track astrocytes' role in epileptic seizures, finding that that astrocyte activity starts approximately 20 seconds before the onset of epileptic neuronal hyperactivity.

Crohn's Disease Today's Healthcare
Published

New Inflammatory Bowel Disease testing protocol could speed up diagnosis      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Patients with suspected inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) could benefit from better testing protocols that would reduce the need and lengthy wait for potentially unnecessary colonoscopies, a new study has found.

Women's Health - General
Published

Next-generation treatments hitch a ride into cancer cells      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers found that a new activator called L687 induces cancer cells to accept delivery of antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) drugs. These drugs can treat cancer by blocking the transfer of messages from genes that encourage cancer growth. Previous methods to deliver ASOs into cells had only limited success. This research will help accelerate the development and delivery of novel ASO cancer therapies.

Today's Healthcare Women's Health - General
Published

Nasal spray safely treats recurrent abnormal heart rhythms, clinical trial suggests      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A clinical trial showed that a nasal spray that patients administer at home, without a physician, successfully and safely treated recurrent episodes of a condition that causes rapid abnormal heart rhythms. The study provides real-world evidence that a wide range of patients can safely and effectively use the experimental drug, called etripamil, to treat recurrent paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT) episodes at home, potentially sparing them the need for repeated hospital trips for more invasive treatments.

Chronic Illness Crohn's Disease Today's Healthcare
Published

Hope for treating autoimmune diseases      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A routine blood test that measures a patient's inflammation levels could improve the early diagnosis and management of a wide range of debilitating autoimmune diseases. The Systemic Inflammation Index (SII) uses information from routine laboratory data to measure inflammation in the body and examining this index in a new way could provide vital answers.

Crohn's Disease Today's Healthcare
Published

Gene analysis generates spatial map of intestinal cells and traces their trajectories during gut inflammation      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Cells within the intestines perform various roles including nutrient absorption, sensing, and maintaining homeostasis. Certain chronic disorders are distinctly characterized by gut inflammation, which disrupts intestinal cells and can lead to a remodeling of the gut and the introduction of new immune cells. To better understand the types of cells and their positioning within the intestines, researchers used a new technique known as MERFISH (multiplexed-error robust-fluorescence in situ hybridization) to analyze 940 genes in 1.35 million intestinal cells in a mouse model of colitis.

Women's Health - General
Published

'Exhausted' immune cells in healthy women could be target for breast cancer prevention      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

People carrying BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations are at high risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer. Researchers have found that changes occur in the immune cells of breast tissue in carriers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations long before breast cancer develops. This raises the possibility of early intervention to prevent the disease, as an alternative to risk-reduction surgery. Drugs already approved for late-stage breast cancer treatment could reactivate the faulty immune cells and keep the breast cells healthy. If successful in mouse models, this preventative therapeutic approach could pave the way for clinical trials in human carriers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations.

Women's Health - General
Published

In the fight against breast cancer, researchers identify malignancy hibernation as the next battleground      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

There is a surprising dearth of research about how breast cancer cells can go dormant, spread and then resurface years or even decades later, according to a new review of in vitro breast cancer studies.

Dietary Supplements and Minerals Nutrition Vitamin Women's Health - General
Published

Fish fed to farmed salmon should be part of our diet, too, study suggests      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Scientists found that farmed salmon production leads to an overall loss of essential dietary nutrients. They say that eating more wild 'feed' species directly could benefit our health while reducing aquaculture demand for finite marine resources.

Women's Health - General
Published

Researchers develop deep learning model to predict breast cancer      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers have developed a new, interpretable artificial intelligence (AI) model to predict 5-year breast cancer risk from mammograms, according to a new study.

Chronic Illness Crohn's Disease
Published

Implantable sensor could lead to timelier Crohn's treatment      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Scientists have developed the first wireless, implantable temperature sensor to detect inflammatory flareups in patients with Crohn's disease. The approach offers long-term, real-time monitoring and could enable clinicians to act earlier to prevent or limit the permanent damage caused by inflammatory episodes.

Crohn's Disease
Published

New understanding of the gut immune system may hold promise for Crohn's disease patients      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Scientists uncovered an overlooked mechanism in the gut immune system of patients suffering from severe cases of Crohn's disease. The discovery may help define how to treat patients with severe Crohn's disease.

Today's Healthcare Women's Health - General
Published

Coronary artery calcium score predictive of heart attacks, strokes      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Coronary artery calcium scoring with CT can identify symptomatic patients with a very low risk of heart attacks or strokes. Researchers said the findings may one day help some patients with stable chest pain avoid invasive coronary angiography.

Women's Health - General
Published

Study sheds light on how neurotransmitter receptors transport calcium      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A new study is shedding light on our understanding of the molecular origins of some forms of autism and intellectual disability. Researchers were able to successfully capture atomic resolution images of the fast-moving ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR) as it transports calcium. iGluRs and their ability to transport calcium are vitally important for many brain functions such as vision or other information coming from sensory organs. Calcium also brings about changes in the signalling capacity of iGluRs and nerve connections which are a key cellular events that lead to our ability to learn new skills and form memories.