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Categories: Birth Control, Women's Health - General

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Healthy Aging Women's Health - General
Published

Could getting enough sleep help prevent osteoporosis?      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

In people's early- to mid-20s, they reach what is called peak bone mineral density, which is higher for men than it is for women, according to researchers. This peak is one of the main determinants of fracture risk later in life. After reaching this peak, a person's bone density remains roughly stable for a couple of decades. Then, when women enter the menopausal transition, they experience accelerated bone loss. Men also experience bone density decline as they age. Sleep patterns also evolve over time.

Depression Menopause Mental Health Research Women's Health - General
Published

Women are 40% more likely to experience depression during the perimenopause      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Women are 40% more likely to experience depression in the perimenopause than those who aren't experiencing any menopausal symptoms, finds a new study.

Women's Health - General
Published

Breast cancer rates rising among Canadian women in their 20s, 30s and 40s      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Rates of breast cancer in women under the age of 50 are rising in Canada according to a study which showed an increase in breast cancer diagnoses among females in their twenties, thirties, and forties.

Birth Defects Women's Health - General
Published

Gene-based therapy restores cellular development and function in brain cells from people with Timothy syndrome      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

In a proof-of-concept study, researchers demonstrated the effectiveness of a potential new therapy for Timothy syndrome, an often life-threatening and rare genetic disorder that affects a wide range of bodily systems, leading to severe cardiac, neurological, and psychiatric symptoms as well as physical differences such as webbed fingers and toes.

Psychology Research Women's Health - General
Published

Glial hyper-drive for triggering epileptic seizures      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

When epileptic patients suffer seizures, their brain is undergoing repetitive and excessive neuronal firing. But what triggers this has stumped scientists for years. Now, researchers have used fluorescence calcium sensors to track astrocytes' role in epileptic seizures, finding that that astrocyte activity starts approximately 20 seconds before the onset of epileptic neuronal hyperactivity.

Women's Health - General
Published

Next-generation treatments hitch a ride into cancer cells      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers found that a new activator called L687 induces cancer cells to accept delivery of antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) drugs. These drugs can treat cancer by blocking the transfer of messages from genes that encourage cancer growth. Previous methods to deliver ASOs into cells had only limited success. This research will help accelerate the development and delivery of novel ASO cancer therapies.

Today's Healthcare Women's Health - General
Published

Nasal spray safely treats recurrent abnormal heart rhythms, clinical trial suggests      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A clinical trial showed that a nasal spray that patients administer at home, without a physician, successfully and safely treated recurrent episodes of a condition that causes rapid abnormal heart rhythms. The study provides real-world evidence that a wide range of patients can safely and effectively use the experimental drug, called etripamil, to treat recurrent paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT) episodes at home, potentially sparing them the need for repeated hospital trips for more invasive treatments.

Birth Control Diabetes Pregnancy and Childbirth Today's Healthcare
Published

Miscarriages linked to health risks in later pregnancies      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers analyzed 52 studies involving more than 4 million pregnancies across 22 countries to investigate the health impacts of miscarriage, abortion and recurrent pregnancy loss (more than two miscarriages in succession) on subsequent pregnancies. The study found different health risks for each group.

Women's Health - General
Published

'Exhausted' immune cells in healthy women could be target for breast cancer prevention      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

People carrying BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations are at high risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer. Researchers have found that changes occur in the immune cells of breast tissue in carriers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations long before breast cancer develops. This raises the possibility of early intervention to prevent the disease, as an alternative to risk-reduction surgery. Drugs already approved for late-stage breast cancer treatment could reactivate the faulty immune cells and keep the breast cells healthy. If successful in mouse models, this preventative therapeutic approach could pave the way for clinical trials in human carriers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations.

Women's Health - General
Published

In the fight against breast cancer, researchers identify malignancy hibernation as the next battleground      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

There is a surprising dearth of research about how breast cancer cells can go dormant, spread and then resurface years or even decades later, according to a new review of in vitro breast cancer studies.

Dietary Supplements and Minerals Nutrition Vitamin Women's Health - General
Published

Fish fed to farmed salmon should be part of our diet, too, study suggests      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Scientists found that farmed salmon production leads to an overall loss of essential dietary nutrients. They say that eating more wild 'feed' species directly could benefit our health while reducing aquaculture demand for finite marine resources.

Women's Health - General
Published

Researchers develop deep learning model to predict breast cancer      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers have developed a new, interpretable artificial intelligence (AI) model to predict 5-year breast cancer risk from mammograms, according to a new study.

Today's Healthcare Women's Health - General
Published

Coronary artery calcium score predictive of heart attacks, strokes      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Coronary artery calcium scoring with CT can identify symptomatic patients with a very low risk of heart attacks or strokes. Researchers said the findings may one day help some patients with stable chest pain avoid invasive coronary angiography.

Women's Health - General
Published

Study sheds light on how neurotransmitter receptors transport calcium      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A new study is shedding light on our understanding of the molecular origins of some forms of autism and intellectual disability. Researchers were able to successfully capture atomic resolution images of the fast-moving ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR) as it transports calcium. iGluRs and their ability to transport calcium are vitally important for many brain functions such as vision or other information coming from sensory organs. Calcium also brings about changes in the signalling capacity of iGluRs and nerve connections which are a key cellular events that lead to our ability to learn new skills and form memories.

Women's Health - General
Published

Damage to cell membranes causes cell aging      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers have discovered that damage to the cell membrane promotes cellular senescence, or cell aging.

Alternative Medicine Chronic Illness Women's Health - General
Published

Compounds in female ginseng could lead to new osteoporosis treatments      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

With ever-increasing life expectancy comes the challenge of treating age-related disorders such as osteoporosis. Although there are effective drugs for treating this metabolic bone disease, they can be expensive and have side effects, limiting their availability to some people. In the search for alternative drug candidates, researchers have discovered and fully replicated a compound from a botanical source, female ginseng, that had potent anti-osteoporotic activity in cellular tests.

Chronic Illness Healthy Aging Women's Health - General
Published

How AI can help spot early risk factors for Alzheimer's disease      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Scientists have found a way to predict Alzheimer's Disease up to seven years before symptoms appear by analyzing patient records with machine learning.

Women's Health - General
Published

Annual breast cancer screening beginning at 40 saves lives      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Annual breast cancer screening beginning at age 40 and continuing to at least age 79 results in the highest reduction in mortality with minimal risks.

Menopause Women's Health - General
Published

Menopause and migraines: New findings point to power of prevention      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Women who have both migraines and a long-term history of hot flashes and/or night sweats have a slightly higher risk of heart disease and stroke, and young women who have migraines have a higher risk of later persistent menopause symptoms, according to two new papers based on a data from a long-term study of the same group of women from their young adult to middle-age years.

Women's Health - General
Published

Strongest contender in decades in fight against breast cancer      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

For decades, hormonal treatment of breast cancer has been going in one direction -- blocking estrogen. Now a global study has discovered there may be another, less toxic way to defeat the most common form of breast cancer.