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Categories: Staying Healthy, Women's Health - General

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Diet and Weight Loss Nutrition Staying Healthy
Published

Mixed diets balance nutrition and carbon footprint      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

What we eat can impact our health as well as the environment. Many studies have looked at the impacts of diets in very general terms focused at the level of food groups. A new study explores this issue following a more nuanced dish-level approach. One of the benefits of this kind of study is that people's connections with their diets vary around the world and have strong cultural associations. Knowledge of the impacts of diets using dishes rather than broad food groups can help individuals make informed choices and those in the food industry improve their practices.

Today's Healthcare Women's Health - General
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Nasal spray safely treats recurrent abnormal heart rhythms, clinical trial suggests      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A clinical trial showed that a nasal spray that patients administer at home, without a physician, successfully and safely treated recurrent episodes of a condition that causes rapid abnormal heart rhythms. The study provides real-world evidence that a wide range of patients can safely and effectively use the experimental drug, called etripamil, to treat recurrent paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT) episodes at home, potentially sparing them the need for repeated hospital trips for more invasive treatments.

Depression Diet and Weight Loss Dieting and Weight Control Mental Health Research Nutrition Obesity Psychology Research Staying Healthy
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Feeding the lonely brain      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A new study has found that women who perceive themselves to be lonely exhibited activity in regions of the brain associated with cravings and motivation towards eating especially when shown pictures of high calorie foods such as sugary foods.

Women's Health - General
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'Exhausted' immune cells in healthy women could be target for breast cancer prevention      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

People carrying BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations are at high risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer. Researchers have found that changes occur in the immune cells of breast tissue in carriers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations long before breast cancer develops. This raises the possibility of early intervention to prevent the disease, as an alternative to risk-reduction surgery. Drugs already approved for late-stage breast cancer treatment could reactivate the faulty immune cells and keep the breast cells healthy. If successful in mouse models, this preventative therapeutic approach could pave the way for clinical trials in human carriers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations.

Diet and Weight Loss Nutrition Staying Healthy
Published

An avocado a day may improve overall diet quality, researchers report      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Eating one avocado per day may improve overall diet quality. A recent study found that the participants who had an avocado per day significantly increased their adherence to dietary guidelines.

Women's Health - General
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In the fight against breast cancer, researchers identify malignancy hibernation as the next battleground      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

There is a surprising dearth of research about how breast cancer cells can go dormant, spread and then resurface years or even decades later, according to a new review of in vitro breast cancer studies.

Dietary Supplements and Minerals Nutrition Vitamin Women's Health - General
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Fish fed to farmed salmon should be part of our diet, too, study suggests      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Scientists found that farmed salmon production leads to an overall loss of essential dietary nutrients. They say that eating more wild 'feed' species directly could benefit our health while reducing aquaculture demand for finite marine resources.

Women's Health - General
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Researchers develop deep learning model to predict breast cancer      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers have developed a new, interpretable artificial intelligence (AI) model to predict 5-year breast cancer risk from mammograms, according to a new study.

Children's Health Diet and Weight Loss Nutrition Staying Healthy
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How home food availability affects young children's nutrient intake      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Early childhood is an important time for learning about nutrition and establishing healthy eating behaviors. Young children rely on parents to provide food options, and the availability of food in the home affects their dietary choices. A new study looks at changes in home food availability and nutrient intake for children from 2 to 4 years old.

Chronic Illness Healthy Aging Staying Healthy
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Researchers identify distinct sleep types and their impact on long-term health      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Poor sleep habits are strongly associated with long-term chronic health conditions, according to decades of research. To better understand this relationship, a team identified four distinct patterns that characterize how most people sleep. These patterns are also predictive of long-term health, the researchers said.

Chronic Illness Diabetes Nutrition Staying Healthy
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Too little sleep raises risk of type 2 diabetes, new study finds      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Adults who sleep only three to five hours per day are at higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to a new study. Chronic sleep deprivation cannot be compensated for by healthy eating alone.

Today's Healthcare Women's Health - General
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Coronary artery calcium score predictive of heart attacks, strokes      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Coronary artery calcium scoring with CT can identify symptomatic patients with a very low risk of heart attacks or strokes. Researchers said the findings may one day help some patients with stable chest pain avoid invasive coronary angiography.

Women's Health - General
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Study sheds light on how neurotransmitter receptors transport calcium      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A new study is shedding light on our understanding of the molecular origins of some forms of autism and intellectual disability. Researchers were able to successfully capture atomic resolution images of the fast-moving ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR) as it transports calcium. iGluRs and their ability to transport calcium are vitally important for many brain functions such as vision or other information coming from sensory organs. Calcium also brings about changes in the signalling capacity of iGluRs and nerve connections which are a key cellular events that lead to our ability to learn new skills and form memories.

Staying Healthy Today's Healthcare
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A safer treatment path for high-risk children to overcome food allergies      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

New research reveals a safe path to overcoming food allergies for older children and others who can't risk consuming allergens orally to build up their resistance. It's called sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT), and it involves placing smaller amounts of food allergens under the tongue. A study has found SLIT to be as safe and effective for high-risk older children and adolescents as oral immunotherapy is for preschoolers.

Nutrition Staying Healthy
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Living near pubs, bars and fast-food restaurants could be bad for heart health      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Exposure to more ready-to-eat food outlets linked to a higher risk of heart failure, in a new study.

Staying Healthy Today's Healthcare
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Drug limits dangerous reactions to allergy-triggering foods, Stanford Medicine-led study of kids finds      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A drug that binds to allergy-causing antibodies can protect children from dangerous reactions to accidentally eating allergy-triggering foods, a new study found.

Women's Health - General
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Damage to cell membranes causes cell aging      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers have discovered that damage to the cell membrane promotes cellular senescence, or cell aging.

Alternative Medicine Chronic Illness Women's Health - General
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Compounds in female ginseng could lead to new osteoporosis treatments      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

With ever-increasing life expectancy comes the challenge of treating age-related disorders such as osteoporosis. Although there are effective drugs for treating this metabolic bone disease, they can be expensive and have side effects, limiting their availability to some people. In the search for alternative drug candidates, researchers have discovered and fully replicated a compound from a botanical source, female ginseng, that had potent anti-osteoporotic activity in cellular tests.

Chronic Illness Healthy Aging Women's Health - General
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How AI can help spot early risk factors for Alzheimer's disease      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Scientists have found a way to predict Alzheimer's Disease up to seven years before symptoms appear by analyzing patient records with machine learning.

Women's Health - General
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Annual breast cancer screening beginning at 40 saves lives      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Annual breast cancer screening beginning at age 40 and continuing to at least age 79 results in the highest reduction in mortality with minimal risks.