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Categories: Sexual Health, Women's Health - General

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Women's Health - General
Published

Damage to cell membranes causes cell aging      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers have discovered that damage to the cell membrane promotes cellular senescence, or cell aging.

Alternative Medicine Chronic Illness Women's Health - General
Published

Compounds in female ginseng could lead to new osteoporosis treatments      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

With ever-increasing life expectancy comes the challenge of treating age-related disorders such as osteoporosis. Although there are effective drugs for treating this metabolic bone disease, they can be expensive and have side effects, limiting their availability to some people. In the search for alternative drug candidates, researchers have discovered and fully replicated a compound from a botanical source, female ginseng, that had potent anti-osteoporotic activity in cellular tests.

Chronic Illness Healthy Aging Women's Health - General
Published

How AI can help spot early risk factors for Alzheimer's disease      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Scientists have found a way to predict Alzheimer's Disease up to seven years before symptoms appear by analyzing patient records with machine learning.

Sexual Health
Published

Researchers are using RNA in a new approach to fight HIV      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A pharmacy associate professor has developed a novel nanomedicine loaded with genetic material called small interfering RNAs (siRNA) to fight human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) using gene therapy.

Women's Health - General
Published

Annual breast cancer screening beginning at 40 saves lives      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Annual breast cancer screening beginning at age 40 and continuing to at least age 79 results in the highest reduction in mortality with minimal risks.

Healthy Aging Sexual Health
Published

Double risk of dementia after mouth ulcer virus      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

People who have had the herpes virus at some point in their lives are twice as likely to develop dementia compared to those who have never been infected. A new study confirms previous research on whether herpes can be a possible risk factor for dementia.

Menopause Women's Health - General
Published

Menopause and migraines: New findings point to power of prevention      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Women who have both migraines and a long-term history of hot flashes and/or night sweats have a slightly higher risk of heart disease and stroke, and young women who have migraines have a higher risk of later persistent menopause symptoms, according to two new papers based on a data from a long-term study of the same group of women from their young adult to middle-age years.

Women's Health - General
Published

Strongest contender in decades in fight against breast cancer      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

For decades, hormonal treatment of breast cancer has been going in one direction -- blocking estrogen. Now a global study has discovered there may be another, less toxic way to defeat the most common form of breast cancer.

Today's Healthcare Women's Health - General
Published

Novel technique has potential to transform breast cancer detection      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

An innovative breast imaging technique provides high sensitivity for detecting cancer while significantly reducing the likelihood of false positive results. Researchers said the technique has the potential to offer more reliable breast cancer screening for a broader range of patients.

Chronic Illness Pregnancy and Childbirth Women's Health - General
Published

The unexpected long-term consequences of female fertility      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

The constant remodeling of the organs of the female reproductive tract during the reproductive cycle leads to fibrosis and chronic inflammation over the years. Scientists have now uncovered these unexpected long-term consequences of female reproductive function in mice.

Fertility Healthy Aging Menopause Today's Healthcare Women's Health - General
Published

How ovarian tissue freezing could prevent menopause -- possibly forever      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A new paradigm around the biological processes of menopause is capturing the attention of scientists. The primary question: can menopause be delayed in healthy women, allowing them to extend their child-bearing years -- and perhaps even forestall some of the health risks and uncomfortable symptoms linked to plummeting estrogen levels?

Women's Health - General
Published

Destroying tumor cells with calcium      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Calcium ions are essential for cells, but can be toxic in higher concentrations. A team of researchers has now designed and prepared a combination drug that kills tumor cells by modulating the calcium influx into the cell. An external calcium source is not necessary because only the calcium ions already present in the tumor tissue are used, according to a new study.

Healthy Aging Menopause Women's Health - General
Published

Women exposed to toxic metals may experience earlier aging of their ovaries      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Middle-aged women who are exposed to toxic metals may have fewer eggs in their ovaries as they approach menopause, according to new research.

Menopause Women's Health - General
Published

Cold water swimming improves menopause symptoms      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Menopausal women who regularly swim in cold water report significant improvements to their physical and mental symptoms, finds a new study.

Women's Health - General
Published

Walking fitness can predict fracture risk in older adults      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

The ability to walk one kilometer comfortably can help predict fracture risk, according to researchers. The findings suggest that simply asking a patient about walking limitation could allow clinicians to identify those in need of further bone health screening and prescribe interventions that could prevent fractures from occurring.

Women's Health - General
Published

Early detection of breast cancer: Study confirms the effectiveness of a new approach      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Early detection of disease is considered positive -- but what if it finds 'too much'? While early diagnosis can improve the chances of recovery, early detection can also have unwanted side effects. After all, not everything that is found would have become life-threatening in the course of the disease. TOSYMA, the world's largest randomized diagnostic superiority study on early breast cancer detection, has now investigated whether the innovative DBT+SM method for early breast cancer detection also has such an effect -- and was once again able to hint on advantages of the approach over the screening standard by finding more early tumor stages of tumor grades 2 and 3.

Today's Healthcare Women's Health - General
Published

Study pinpoints breast cancer 'cells of origin' in high-risk women      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Australian scientists have pinpointed likely 'cells of origin', the source cells that can grow into breast cancer, in women carrying a faulty BRCA2 gene who are at high risk of developing the disease. The study also showed these cells have potential to be targeted with an existing cancer drug to delay tumour growth, in findings that may lead to future preventive treatments for the disease.

Chronic Illness Healthy Aging Women's Health - General
Published

Incontinence could point to future disability      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Having more frequent urinary incontinence and leakage amounts is associated with higher odds of disability, according to researchers.

Fertility Pregnancy and Childbirth Women's Health - General
Published

Infertility: Sperm need a breakthrough for fertilization      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A new study identifies the defective function of CatSper, an ion channel controlling calcium levels in sperm, as a common cause of seemingly unexplained male infertility. CatSper-deficient human sperm fail to fertilize the egg, because they cannot penetrate its protective vestments. Thus far, this sperm channelopathy has remained undetectable. Scientists have unravelled CatSper's role in infertility using a novel laboratory test that identifies affected men.

Sexual Health
Published

Genetic variants underlying male bisexual behavior, risk-taking linked to more children, study shows      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Because same-sex sexual behavior does not result in offspring, evolutionary biologists have long wondered how the genes associated with this behavior have persisted in the human genome, and whether they will remain in the future. A new study suggests that part of the explanation -- specifically for male bisexuals -- has to do with risk-taking behavior.