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Categories: Breastfeeding, Women's Health - General

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Women's Health - General
Published

Next-generation treatments hitch a ride into cancer cells      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers found that a new activator called L687 induces cancer cells to accept delivery of antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) drugs. These drugs can treat cancer by blocking the transfer of messages from genes that encourage cancer growth. Previous methods to deliver ASOs into cells had only limited success. This research will help accelerate the development and delivery of novel ASO cancer therapies.

Today's Healthcare Women's Health - General
Published

Nasal spray safely treats recurrent abnormal heart rhythms, clinical trial suggests      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A clinical trial showed that a nasal spray that patients administer at home, without a physician, successfully and safely treated recurrent episodes of a condition that causes rapid abnormal heart rhythms. The study provides real-world evidence that a wide range of patients can safely and effectively use the experimental drug, called etripamil, to treat recurrent paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT) episodes at home, potentially sparing them the need for repeated hospital trips for more invasive treatments.

Breastfeeding Diet and Weight Loss Infant's Health
Published

Infant gut microbes have their own circadian rhythm, and diet has little impact on how the microbiome assembles      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Infant gut microbiomes oscillate with a circadian rhythm, even when they are cultivated outside of the body. Researchers report that the rhythm is detectable as early as 2 weeks after birth but becomes more pronounced with age. The finding comes from a randomized controlled trial that also showed that diet has less impact on the development and composition of the infant microbiome than previously thought.

Women's Health - General
Published

'Exhausted' immune cells in healthy women could be target for breast cancer prevention      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

People carrying BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations are at high risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer. Researchers have found that changes occur in the immune cells of breast tissue in carriers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations long before breast cancer develops. This raises the possibility of early intervention to prevent the disease, as an alternative to risk-reduction surgery. Drugs already approved for late-stage breast cancer treatment could reactivate the faulty immune cells and keep the breast cells healthy. If successful in mouse models, this preventative therapeutic approach could pave the way for clinical trials in human carriers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations.

Women's Health - General
Published

In the fight against breast cancer, researchers identify malignancy hibernation as the next battleground      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

There is a surprising dearth of research about how breast cancer cells can go dormant, spread and then resurface years or even decades later, according to a new review of in vitro breast cancer studies.

Dietary Supplements and Minerals Nutrition Vitamin Women's Health - General
Published

Fish fed to farmed salmon should be part of our diet, too, study suggests      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Scientists found that farmed salmon production leads to an overall loss of essential dietary nutrients. They say that eating more wild 'feed' species directly could benefit our health while reducing aquaculture demand for finite marine resources.

Women's Health - General
Published

Researchers develop deep learning model to predict breast cancer      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers have developed a new, interpretable artificial intelligence (AI) model to predict 5-year breast cancer risk from mammograms, according to a new study.

Breastfeeding Infant's Health Nutrition Today's Healthcare
Published

Infant health suffered during baby formula shortage      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A survey by UC Davis researchers shows the U.S. baby formula shortage in 2022 led 81% of parents to switch brands or types, causing health effects for babies.

Today's Healthcare Women's Health - General
Published

Coronary artery calcium score predictive of heart attacks, strokes      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Coronary artery calcium scoring with CT can identify symptomatic patients with a very low risk of heart attacks or strokes. Researchers said the findings may one day help some patients with stable chest pain avoid invasive coronary angiography.

Breastfeeding Infant's Health
Published

Breastfeeding after COVID-19 booster can give babies antibodies      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A recently published study that shows lactating mothers who get the COVID-19 booster pass along the antibodies to their children via their breast milk -- and potentially protect babies too young to receive the vaccine.

Women's Health - General
Published

Study sheds light on how neurotransmitter receptors transport calcium      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A new study is shedding light on our understanding of the molecular origins of some forms of autism and intellectual disability. Researchers were able to successfully capture atomic resolution images of the fast-moving ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR) as it transports calcium. iGluRs and their ability to transport calcium are vitally important for many brain functions such as vision or other information coming from sensory organs. Calcium also brings about changes in the signalling capacity of iGluRs and nerve connections which are a key cellular events that lead to our ability to learn new skills and form memories.

Women's Health - General
Published

Damage to cell membranes causes cell aging      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers have discovered that damage to the cell membrane promotes cellular senescence, or cell aging.

Alternative Medicine Chronic Illness Women's Health - General
Published

Compounds in female ginseng could lead to new osteoporosis treatments      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

With ever-increasing life expectancy comes the challenge of treating age-related disorders such as osteoporosis. Although there are effective drugs for treating this metabolic bone disease, they can be expensive and have side effects, limiting their availability to some people. In the search for alternative drug candidates, researchers have discovered and fully replicated a compound from a botanical source, female ginseng, that had potent anti-osteoporotic activity in cellular tests.

Chronic Illness Healthy Aging Women's Health - General
Published

How AI can help spot early risk factors for Alzheimer's disease      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Scientists have found a way to predict Alzheimer's Disease up to seven years before symptoms appear by analyzing patient records with machine learning.

Women's Health - General
Published

Annual breast cancer screening beginning at 40 saves lives      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Annual breast cancer screening beginning at age 40 and continuing to at least age 79 results in the highest reduction in mortality with minimal risks.

Menopause Women's Health - General
Published

Menopause and migraines: New findings point to power of prevention      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Women who have both migraines and a long-term history of hot flashes and/or night sweats have a slightly higher risk of heart disease and stroke, and young women who have migraines have a higher risk of later persistent menopause symptoms, according to two new papers based on a data from a long-term study of the same group of women from their young adult to middle-age years.

Women's Health - General
Published

Strongest contender in decades in fight against breast cancer      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

For decades, hormonal treatment of breast cancer has been going in one direction -- blocking estrogen. Now a global study has discovered there may be another, less toxic way to defeat the most common form of breast cancer.

Today's Healthcare Women's Health - General
Published

Novel technique has potential to transform breast cancer detection      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

An innovative breast imaging technique provides high sensitivity for detecting cancer while significantly reducing the likelihood of false positive results. Researchers said the technique has the potential to offer more reliable breast cancer screening for a broader range of patients.

Chronic Illness Pregnancy and Childbirth Women's Health - General
Published

The unexpected long-term consequences of female fertility      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

The constant remodeling of the organs of the female reproductive tract during the reproductive cycle leads to fibrosis and chronic inflammation over the years. Scientists have now uncovered these unexpected long-term consequences of female reproductive function in mice.

Fertility Healthy Aging Menopause Today's Healthcare Women's Health - General
Published

How ovarian tissue freezing could prevent menopause -- possibly forever      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A new paradigm around the biological processes of menopause is capturing the attention of scientists. The primary question: can menopause be delayed in healthy women, allowing them to extend their child-bearing years -- and perhaps even forestall some of the health risks and uncomfortable symptoms linked to plummeting estrogen levels?