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Categories: Skin Care, Women's Health - General

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Women's Health - General
Published

Damage to cell membranes causes cell aging      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Researchers have discovered that damage to the cell membrane promotes cellular senescence, or cell aging.

Chronic Illness Healthy Aging Women's Health - General
Published

How AI can help spot early risk factors for Alzheimer's disease      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Scientists have found a way to predict Alzheimer's Disease up to seven years before symptoms appear by analyzing patient records with machine learning.

Women's Health - General
Published

Annual breast cancer screening beginning at 40 saves lives      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Annual breast cancer screening beginning at age 40 and continuing to at least age 79 results in the highest reduction in mortality with minimal risks.

Cosmetic Surgery Cosmetics Healthy Aging Skin Care
Published

Turning back the clock on photoaging skin      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A new study examines dermal injections and their impact on skin aging.

Skin Care Today's Healthcare
Published

Wound-homing molecule accelerates tissue repair      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Medical researchers have found a peptide which, when administered intravenously, homes in on the new blood vessels that are forming in damaged tissue. The peptide has been used as a delivery vehicle for therapeutics targeted at regenerating tissues. A new study has discovered that the peptide activates the natural healing mechanism in the tissue, accelerating regeneration. The finding opens new opportunities to treat not only skin wounds, but also any injuries resulting from accidents and traumas, such as ruptured muscles and fractured bones.

Menopause Women's Health - General
Published

Menopause and migraines: New findings point to power of prevention      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Women who have both migraines and a long-term history of hot flashes and/or night sweats have a slightly higher risk of heart disease and stroke, and young women who have migraines have a higher risk of later persistent menopause symptoms, according to two new papers based on a data from a long-term study of the same group of women from their young adult to middle-age years.

Healthy Aging Skin Care
Published

Non-invasive techniques to detect skin cancer      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A study has demonstrated that the appearance of ageing skin looks noticeably different compared to younger skin, when examined under polarized laser light. The scientists believe that their new finding could pave the way for new, non-invasive light-based techniques to detect diseases, including cancer, in older individuals. This could significantly enhance early-stage treatment options for various skin conditions.

Women's Health - General
Published

Strongest contender in decades in fight against breast cancer      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

For decades, hormonal treatment of breast cancer has been going in one direction -- blocking estrogen. Now a global study has discovered there may be another, less toxic way to defeat the most common form of breast cancer.

Today's Healthcare Women's Health - General
Published

Novel technique has potential to transform breast cancer detection      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

An innovative breast imaging technique provides high sensitivity for detecting cancer while significantly reducing the likelihood of false positive results. Researchers said the technique has the potential to offer more reliable breast cancer screening for a broader range of patients.

Chronic Illness Pregnancy and Childbirth Women's Health - General
Published

The unexpected long-term consequences of female fertility      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

The constant remodeling of the organs of the female reproductive tract during the reproductive cycle leads to fibrosis and chronic inflammation over the years. Scientists have now uncovered these unexpected long-term consequences of female reproductive function in mice.

Skin Care Today's Healthcare
Published

Doctors have more difficulty diagnosing disease when looking at images of darker skin      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Doctors do not perform as well diagnosing skin diseases when the patient has darker skin, according to a new study. The researchers found assistance from artificial intelligence could improve doctors' accuracy, but those improvements were greater in patients with lighter skin.

Fertility Healthy Aging Menopause Today's Healthcare Women's Health - General
Published

How ovarian tissue freezing could prevent menopause -- possibly forever      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A new paradigm around the biological processes of menopause is capturing the attention of scientists. The primary question: can menopause be delayed in healthy women, allowing them to extend their child-bearing years -- and perhaps even forestall some of the health risks and uncomfortable symptoms linked to plummeting estrogen levels?

Skin Care Today's Healthcare
Published

Small RNAs take on the big task of helping skin wounds heal better and faster with minimal scarring      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

New findings report that a class of small RNAs (microRNAs), microRNA-29, can restore normal skin structure rather than producing a wound closure by a connective tissue (scar). Any improvement of normal skin repair would benefit many patients affected by large-area or deep wounds prone to dysfunctional scarring.

Skin Care
Published

Sweat-resistant wearable robot sensor      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

A joint research team has developed a stretchable and adhesive microneedle sensor that can be attached to the skin and stably measure high-quality electrophysiological signals for a long period of time.

Women's Health - General
Published

Destroying tumor cells with calcium      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Calcium ions are essential for cells, but can be toxic in higher concentrations. A team of researchers has now designed and prepared a combination drug that kills tumor cells by modulating the calcium influx into the cell. An external calcium source is not necessary because only the calcium ions already present in the tumor tissue are used, according to a new study.

Skin Care Today's Healthcare
Published

Study could pave the way for better diagnosis of rare genetic diseases      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Using groundbreaking CRISPR technology, a team of researchers has activated genes in easily accessible cells, which could revolutionize the understanding and diagnosis of genetic diseases.

Healthy Aging Menopause Women's Health - General
Published

Women exposed to toxic metals may experience earlier aging of their ovaries      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Middle-aged women who are exposed to toxic metals may have fewer eggs in their ovaries as they approach menopause, according to new research.

Menopause Women's Health - General
Published

Cold water swimming improves menopause symptoms      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Menopausal women who regularly swim in cold water report significant improvements to their physical and mental symptoms, finds a new study.

Women's Health - General
Published

Walking fitness can predict fracture risk in older adults      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

The ability to walk one kilometer comfortably can help predict fracture risk, according to researchers. The findings suggest that simply asking a patient about walking limitation could allow clinicians to identify those in need of further bone health screening and prescribe interventions that could prevent fractures from occurring.

Women's Health - General
Published

Early detection of breast cancer: Study confirms the effectiveness of a new approach      (via sciencedaily.com)     Original source 

Early detection of disease is considered positive -- but what if it finds 'too much'? While early diagnosis can improve the chances of recovery, early detection can also have unwanted side effects. After all, not everything that is found would have become life-threatening in the course of the disease. TOSYMA, the world's largest randomized diagnostic superiority study on early breast cancer detection, has now investigated whether the innovative DBT+SM method for early breast cancer detection also has such an effect -- and was once again able to hint on advantages of the approach over the screening standard by finding more early tumor stages of tumor grades 2 and 3.