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Abstract on Zika-exposed children may display neurodevelopmental differences, study finds Original source 

Zika-exposed children may display neurodevelopmental differences, study finds

Introduction

Zika virus is a mosquito-borne virus that has been linked to a range of neurological disorders, including microcephaly, a condition in which babies are born with abnormally small heads and underdeveloped brains. A new study has found that children who were exposed to the Zika virus in utero may display neurodevelopmental differences compared to children who were not exposed.

What is Zika virus?

Zika virus is a virus that is primarily transmitted through the bite of an infected Aedes mosquito. The virus can also be transmitted through sexual contact, blood transfusions, and from mother to child during pregnancy. Symptoms of Zika virus infection include fever, rash, joint pain, and conjunctivitis.

The study

The study, which was published in the journal JAMA Network Open, analyzed data from 216 children who were born in Brazil between 2015 and 2016. Of these children, 112 were born to mothers who were infected with the Zika virus during pregnancy, while 104 were born to mothers who were not infected.

The researchers found that children who were exposed to the Zika virus in utero had lower scores on tests of cognitive and motor development compared to children who were not exposed. The differences were most pronounced in children who had been exposed to the virus during the first trimester of pregnancy.

What does this mean for children who were exposed to Zika virus?

The findings of this study suggest that children who were exposed to the Zika virus in utero may be at risk for neurodevelopmental differences. However, it is important to note that not all children who were exposed to the virus will experience these differences, and that the severity of the differences may vary from child to child.

What can be done to help children who were exposed to Zika virus?

If you are the parent or caregiver of a child who was exposed to the Zika virus in utero, it is important to monitor your child's development closely and to seek medical attention if you have any concerns. Early intervention and support can help children with neurodevelopmental differences reach their full potential.

Conclusion

The Zika virus is a serious public health concern, and this study highlights the potential long-term effects of the virus on children who were exposed in utero. While not all children who were exposed to the virus will experience neurodevelopmental differences, it is important for parents and caregivers to be aware of the potential risks and to seek medical attention if they have any concerns.

FAQs

1. What is microcephaly?

Microcephaly is a condition in which babies are born with abnormally small heads and underdeveloped brains. It has been linked to Zika virus infection during pregnancy.

2. How is Zika virus transmitted?

Zika virus is primarily transmitted through the bite of an infected Aedes mosquito. It can also be transmitted through sexual contact, blood transfusions, and from mother to child during pregnancy.

3. Can children who were exposed to Zika virus in utero be treated for neurodevelopmental differences?

Early intervention and support can help children with neurodevelopmental differences reach their full potential. It is important for parents and caregivers to monitor their child's development closely and to seek medical attention if they have any concerns.

 


This abstract is presented as an informational news item only and has not been reviewed by a medical professional. This abstract should not be considered medical advice. This abstract might have been generated by an artificial intelligence program. See TOS for details.

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