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Abstract on Carrots plus sticks: Study looks at what works to reduce low-value care Original source 

Carrots plus sticks: Study looks at what works to reduce low-value care

In the world of healthcare, low-value care is a significant problem. It refers to medical treatments, tests, and procedures that provide little to no benefit to patients, yet are still performed regularly. This type of care not only wastes resources but can also harm patients. A recent study has looked at what works to reduce low-value care, and the results are promising.

What is low-value care?

Low-value care refers to medical treatments, tests, and procedures that provide little to no benefit to patients. These can include things like unnecessary imaging tests, antibiotics for viral infections, and routine preoperative testing for low-risk surgeries. Low-value care not only wastes resources but can also harm patients by exposing them to unnecessary risks and side effects.

The study

The study, published in JAMA Internal Medicine, looked at the effectiveness of different strategies for reducing low-value care. The researchers analyzed data from 48 studies that evaluated various interventions aimed at reducing low-value care. These interventions included financial incentives, education and training, decision support tools, and more.

The results

The study found that a combination of financial incentives and education and training was the most effective strategy for reducing low-value care. Financial incentives, such as pay-for-performance programs, were found to be effective in reducing low-value care in some cases. However, they were not always successful and could sometimes lead to unintended consequences, such as providers avoiding patients who are more difficult to treat.

Education and training, on the other hand, were found to be effective in reducing low-value care in a variety of settings. This included interventions such as educational campaigns, feedback on performance, and clinical decision support tools. These interventions helped providers to better understand when low-value care was being provided and how to avoid it.

Conclusion

Reducing low-value care is an important goal for healthcare providers and policymakers. The study's findings suggest that a combination of financial incentives and education and training is the most effective strategy for achieving this goal. However, it is important to note that there is no one-size-fits-all solution, and different interventions may be more effective in different settings. By continuing to study and evaluate different strategies, we can work towards providing high-quality, cost-effective care to all patients.

FAQs

1. What is low-value care?

Low-value care refers to medical treatments, tests, and procedures that provide little to no benefit to patients.

2. Why is reducing low-value care important?

Reducing low-value care is important because it wastes resources and can harm patients by exposing them to unnecessary risks and side effects.

3. What was the most effective strategy for reducing low-value care according to the study?

The study found that a combination of financial incentives and education and training was the most effective strategy for reducing low-value care.

4. What are some examples of low-value care?

Examples of low-value care include unnecessary imaging tests, antibiotics for viral infections, and routine preoperative testing for low-risk surgeries.

5. Are there any unintended consequences of financial incentives for reducing low-value care?

Yes, financial incentives can sometimes lead to unintended consequences, such as providers avoiding patients who are more difficult to treat.

 


This abstract is presented as an informational news item only and has not been reviewed by a medical professional. This abstract should not be considered medical advice. This abstract might have been generated by an artificial intelligence program. See TOS for details.

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